Etymology
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dell (n.2)

rogue's cant 16c.-17c. for "a wench, a young girl of the vagrant class," 1560s, of uncertain origin.

A Dell is a yonge wenche, able for generation, and not yet knowen or broken by the vpright man. ... [W]hen they have beene lyen with all by the vpright man then they be Doxes, and no Dells. [Thomas Harman, "A Caveat or Warning for Common Cursitors," 1567]
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gull (n.2)

cant term for "dupe, sucker, credulous person," 1590s, of uncertain origin. Perhaps from verb meaning "to dupe, cheat" (see gull (v.)). Or it is perhaps from (or influenced by) the bird name (see gull (n.1)); in either case with a sense of "someone who will swallow anything thrown at him." Another possibility is Middle English gull, goll "newly hatched bird" (late 14c.), which is perhaps from Old Norse golr "yellow," from the hue of its down.

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pad (v.1)

"to walk, travel on foot, tramp slowly or wearily along," 1550s, probably from Middle Dutch paden "walk along a path, make a path," from pad, pat "path" (compare path). Originally a cant word among criminals and vagabonds, perhaps of imitative origin (sound of feet trudging on a dirt road). Related: Padded; padding. English also formerly had the noun pad meaning "path, foot path" (1560s), which might be from this verb, or from the Dutch noun, or a variant of path.

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cantaloupe (n.)

also cantaloup, small, round type of melon, 1739, from French, from Italian, from Cantalupo, name of a former Papal summer estate near Rome, where the melons first were grown in Europe after their introduction (supposedly from Armenia). The place name seems to be "singing wolf" and might refer to a spot where wolves gathered, but the name or the story might be folk etymology.

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cantankerous (adj.)

"marked by ill-tempered contradiction or opposition," 1772, said by Grose to be "a Wiltshire word," conjectured to be from an alteration (influenced perhaps by raucous) of a dialectal survival of Middle English contakour "troublemaker" (c. 1300), which is from Anglo-French contec "discord, strife," from Old French contechier (Old North French contekier), from con- "with" + teche, related to atachier "hold fast" (see attach). With -ous. Related: Cantankerously; cantankerousness.

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cantina (n.)

"bar room, saloon," 1892, Texas and U.S. southwest dialect, from Spanish and Italian form of canteen in the "wine cellar" sense.

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canto (n.)

1580s, "a section of a long poem," used in Italian by Dante, in English first by Spenser, from Italian canto "song," from Latin cantus "song, a singing; bird-song," from past participle stem of canere "to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing").

In medieval music, canto fermo (1789, from Italian, from Latin cantus firmus "fixed song") was the ancient traditional vocal music of the Church, so called because set by authority and unalterable. After time other voices were added above and below it.

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Canton 

18c., the former English transliteration of the name of the major port city in southern China and the region around it, properly the name of the region, now known in English as Guangdong (formerly also transliterated as Quang-tung, Kwangtung), from guang "wide, large, vast" + dong "east." The city name itself is now transliterated as Guangzhou (guang, from the province name, + zhou "region"). One of the first Chinese cities open to Westerners; the older form of the name is from the British-run, Hong Kong-based Chinese postal system.

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cantata (n.)

1724, "musical recitation of a story," from Italian cantata, literally "that which is sung," past participle of cantare "to sing," from Latin cantare "to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing").

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cantor (n.)

1530s, "church song-leader," from Latin cantor "singer, poet, actor," agent noun from past-participle stem of canere "to sing" (from PIE root *kan- "to sing"). Applied in English to the Hebrew chazzan from 1893. Related: Cantorial.

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