Etymology
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wryneck (n.)
1580s, from wry + neck (n.). The bird so called from the singular manner in which is can twist the neck.
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judicable (adj.)
1640s, from Late Latin iudicabilis "that can be judged," from iudicare "to judge," which is related to iudicem "a judge" (see judge (n.)).
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ne plus ultra 
"utmost limit to which one can go," Latin, literally "no more beyond;" the motto traditionally inscribed on the Pillars of Hercules.
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*magh- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to be able, have power." It forms all or part of: dismay; deus ex machina; may (v.1) "am able;" might (n.) "bodily strength, power;" main; machine; mechanic; mechanism; mechano-; mage; magi; magic.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit mahan "great;" Greek mēkhanē "device, means," mekhos, makhos "means, instrument;" Old Church Slavonic mošti, Russian moč' "can, be able;" Old English mæg "I can," Gothic mag "can, is able," Old High German magan, Old Norse magn "power, might."

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lubricant (n.)
"material that can reduce friction in rubbing surfaces," 1828, probably from lubricant (adj.), or else from Latin lubricantem.
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mouthful (n.)

early 15c., "as much as a mouth can hold," from mouth (n.) + -ful. Meaning "a lot to say" is from 1748.

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alienable (adj.)

"that can be surrendered or given up," 1610s; from obsolete alien (v.), for which see alienate, + -able. Related: Alienability.

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variable (n.)
"quantity that can vary in value," 1816, from variable (adj.) in mathematical sense of "quantitatively indeterminate" (1710). Related: Variably; variability.
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interwork (v.)
c. 1600, a hybrid from inter- "between" + work (v.). Related: interworking. Past tense can be either interworked or interwrought.
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interpretable (adj.)
1610s, from Late Latin interpretabilis "that can be explained or translated," from Latin interpretari "explain, expound, understand" (see interpret).
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