Etymology
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vox 

Latin, literally "voice," which is the source of vocare "to call" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

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invoke (v.)

late 15c., from Old French invoquer, envoquer, envochier "invoke, implore" (12c.), from Latin invocare "call upon, implore," from in- "upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + vocare "to call," which is related to vox (genitive vocis) "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak"). Related: Invoked; invoking.

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pro-life (adj.)

"opposed to abortion," attested by 1976, from pro- + life. Used earlier in a more general sense of "enhancing life." Hostile alternative anti-choice is attested by 1978 in Ms. magazine (compare pro-choice).

What hypocrisy to call such anti-humanitarian people 'pro-life.' Call them what they are — antichoice. [Ms., Oct. 8, 1978]
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nudge (n.2)

"a slight push with the elbow," 1787, from nudge (v.). Figurative sense of "a signal or hint intended to call attention, remind, etc." is by 1831.

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clamor (n.)

late 14c., "a great outcry," also figurative, "loud or urgent demand," from Old French clamor "call, cry, appeal, outcry" (12c., Modern French clameur), from Latin clamor "a shout, a loud call" (either friendly or hostile), from clamare "to cry out" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout").

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oi (interj.)

1962, vulgar or working class pronunciation of hoy a call or shout to attract attention (compare ahoy).

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opine (v.)

mid-15c., opinen, "express an opinion or opinions; to think, suppose," also transitive, "be of the opinion that," from Old French oppiner, opiner (15c.) and directly from Latin opinari "have an opinion, be of opinion, suppose, conjecture, think, judge," which is of unknown origin. It is traditionally considered to be related to optare "to desire, choose" (see option), but de Vaan's sources find the evidence of this weak. Related: Opined; opining.

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wake-up (n.)

something that brings one to alertness or out of sleep, 1965, often in the 1960s in reference to a shot of heroin in the morning. Phrase wake-up call is attested from 1968, originally a call one received from the hotel desk in the morning. Verbal phrase wake up is from 1530s; earlier the adverb was out (late 14c.)

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*gal- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to call, shout."

It forms all or part of: call; clatter; Gallic; gallinaceous; gallium; glasnost; Glagolitic.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit garhati "bewail, criticize;" Latin gallus "cock;" Old English ceallian "to shout, utter in a loud voice," Old Norse kalla "to cry loudly," Dutch kallen "to talk, chatter;" German Klage "complaint, grievance, lament, accusation;" Old English clacu "affront;" Old Church Slavonic glasu "voice," glagolu "word;" Welsh galw "call."

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exclaim (v.)

"to cry out, speak with vehemence, make a loud outcry in words," 1560s, a back-formation from exclamation or else from French exclamer (16c.), from Latin exclamare "cry out loud, call out," from ex "out," perhaps here an intensive prefix (see ex-), + clamare "cry, shout, call" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout"). Spelling influenced by claim. Related: Exclaimed; exclaiming.

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