Etymology
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in extremis 
"at the point of death," 16c., Latin, literally "in the farthest reaches," from ablative plural of extremus "extreme" (see extreme (adj.)).
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in-migration (n.)
1942, American English, in reference to movement within the same country (as distinguished from immigration), from in (prep.) + migration.
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log in (v.)
verbal phrase, 1963 in the computing sense, from log (v.2) + in (adv.).
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all-in (adj.)
"without restrictions," 1890, from the adverbial phrase; see all + in (adv.).
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in vitro 
1892, scientific Latin; "in a test tube, culture dish, etc.;" literally "in glass," from Latin vitrum "glass" (see vitreous).
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in-service (adj.)
also inservice, 1928, from in (prep.) + service (n.).
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drive-in (adj.)

in reference to of restaurants, banks, etc., built to be patronized without leaving one's car, 1929, from the verbal phrase; see drive (v.) + in (adv.). Of movie theaters by 1933 (the year the first one opened, in Camden, New Jersey).

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hang in (v.)
"persist through adversity," 1969, usually with there; see hang (v.) + in (adv.).
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in-going (adj.)
also ingoing, 1825, from in + going. Probably a modern formation unrelated to Middle English in-going (n.) "act of entering" (mid-14c.), from ingo "to go in, enter," from Old English ingan (past tense ineode), equivalent of German eingehen, Dutch ingaan.
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in-transit (adj.)
1907, from commercial verbal phrase in transit "on the way or passage, while passing from one to another" (1819, earlier in Latin form in transitu), from in + transit (n.).
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