Etymology
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re-up (v.)

"re-enlist," by 1906, U.S. armed forces slang, from re- "back, again" + up (v.) "enlist." Related: Re-upped; re-upping.

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dust-up (n.)

also dustup, "fight, quarrel, disturbance," 1897, from dust + up; perhaps from dust "confusion, disturbance" (1590s), also compare kick up a dust "cause an uproar" (1753). To dust (someone's) coat was ironical for "to beat (someone) soundly" (1680s).

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get-up (n.)

also getup, 1847, "equipment, costume," from get (v.) + up (adv.). Meaning "initiative, energy" recorded from 1841. The verbal phrase is recorded from mid-14c. as "to rise."

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runner-up (n.)

1842, originally in dog racing, "dog that loses only the final race;" see runner + up. The more general sense of "team or competitor that takes second place" is from 1885.

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lace-up (adj.)

1831, originally of boots, from the verbal phrase, from lace (v.) + up (adv.).

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lead-up (n.)

1917, from verbal phrase; see lead (v.1) + up (adv.). To lead up to "prepare gradually for" is from 1861.

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lock-up (n.)

also lockup, "detention cell for offenders," 1838, perhaps short for earlier lock-up house; from the verbal phrase. Meaning "action of locking up" is from 1845. The verbal phrase lock (someone) up in a dwelling, prison, etc., is from early 15c. Of things, "to hold in safekeeping or concealment," also early 15c. See lock (v.) + up (adv.). To lock up (intransitive) "lock all the doors" (of a house, shop, etc.) is from 1901.

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moon-up (n.)

"moonrise," U.S. dialectal, 1907, from moon (n.) probably based on sun-up (q.v.).

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pile-up (n.)

"multi-vehicle crash," 1929, from verbal phrase pile up "to heap up" (c. 1400), which is attested from 1849 as "to accumulate," 1899 as "to wreck in a heap" (see pile (v.)).

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up-and-down (adj.)

1610s, from adverbial phrase up and down (c. 1200); see up (adv.) + down (adv.).

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