Etymology
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mix-up (n.)

"state of confusion," 1841, from the colloquial verbal phrase mix up "to confuse, entangle mentally" (1806), from mix (v.) + up (adv.). Of fighters, to mix it up "exchange blows" is by 1898.

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chin-up (n.)

also chinup, type of exercise, 1940, from chin (v.) + up (adv.). Earlier it was called chinning the bar and under names such as this is described by 1883.

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toss-up (n.)

"even matter," 1809, from earlier sense of "a flipping of a coin to arrive at a decision" (c. 1700), from verbal phrase, from toss (v.) + up (adv.).

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grown-up (adj.)

"mature," late 14c., past-participle adjective from grow up. The noun meaning "adult person" is from 1813, short for grown-up person, etc.

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dial-up (adj.)

1961 in reference to a data transmission link via public telephone network, from the verbal phrase; see dial (v.) + up (adv.).

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work-up (n.)

"diagnostic examination of a patient," 1961, from the verbal phrase; see work (v.) + up (adv.).

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catch-up (n.)

"a working to overtake a leading rival," by 1971, probably a figurative use from U.S. football in reference to being behind in the score. The verbal phrase catch up was used from early 14c. in the sense of "raise aloft," it is attested from c. 1400 as "to take up suddenly," and by 1846 in the sense of "get to the same point, overtake;" see catch (v.) + up (adv.).

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make-up (n.)

also makeup, "manner in which something is put together," 1821, from the verbal phrase (see make (v.) + up (adv.)). To make up "build, collect into one form by bringing together" is from late 14c., also "prepare." It is attested from late 15c. as "supply as an equivalent," from 1660s as "end a quarrel, reconcile, settle differences, become friends again," by 1825 as "to fabricate artfully" (a story, etc.).

In reference to an actor, "prepare for impersonating a role" (including dress and the painting of the face), by 1808. Hence the noun sense of "appearance of the face and dress" (1858) and the sense of "cosmetics," attested by 1886, originally of actors.

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re-up (v.)

"re-enlist," by 1906, U.S. armed forces slang, from re- "back, again" + up (v.) "enlist." Related: Re-upped; re-upping.

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dust-up (n.)

also dustup, "fight, quarrel, disturbance," 1897, from dust + up; perhaps from dust "confusion, disturbance" (1590s), also compare kick up a dust "cause an uproar" (1753). To dust (someone's) coat was ironical for "to beat (someone) soundly" (1680s).

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