Etymology
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blockage (n.)
"obstruction," 1827, from block (v.1) + -age.
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coetaneous (adj.)

"having the same age as another, beginning to exist at the same time," c. 1600, from Late Latin coaetanus "one of the same age," from assimilated form of Latin com "with, together with" (see com-) + aetas "age" (from PIE root *aiw- "vital force, life; long life, eternity") + adjectival suffix -aneus. Related: Coetaneously.

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spousage (n.)
"marriage, wedlock," mid-14c., from spouse (n.) + -age.
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shortage (n.)
1862, American English, from short + -age.
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dotage (n.)

late 14c., "condition of being foolish; foolish love, infatuation," literally "the condition of one who dotes," from dote (v.) + -age. Also from late 14c. as "senility; feebleness or imbecility of mind in old age."

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adolescence (n.)
"age following childhood, age of growing" (roughly the period from the 15th to the 21st year; or age 14 to 25 in males, 12 to 21 in females), early 15c., from Old French adolescence (13c.), from Latin adolescentia/adulescentia "youth, youthful people collectively," abstract noun from adulescentem "growing, youthful" (see adolescent (n.)). Adolescency (late 14c.) is slightly earlier.
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haulage (n.)
1826, "action of hauling," from haul (v.) + -age.
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post-glacial (adj.)

"subsequent to the Ice Age," 1855, from post- + glacial.

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slippage (n.)
1850, "act of slipping," from slip (v.) + -age.
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