Etymology
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fer de lance (n.)

large venomous snake of American tropics, 1817, from French, "lance-head," literally "iron of a lance." So called for its shape.

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Petri dish (n.)

1892, named for German bacteriologist Julius Petri (1852-1922), who first devised it c. 1887.

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sweet tooth (n.)

"fondness for sugary stuff," late 14c., from sweet (adj.) + tooth in the sense of "taste, liking" (see toothsome).

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res 

Latin word once used in various phrases in English, often in legal language, where it means "the condition of something, the matter in hand or point at issue;" literally "thing" (see re). For example res ipsa loquitur "the thing speaks for itself;" res judicata "a point decided by competent authority."

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worry wart (n.)

1930, from newspaper comic "Out Our Way" by U.S. cartoonist J.R. Williams (1888-1957), in which Worry Wart is attested by 1929. Worry Wart was a generic nickname or insult for any character who caused others to worry, which is the inverse of the current colloquial meaning. For example, from the comic printed in the Los Angeles Record, Dec. 5, 1929: One kid scolds another for driving a screw with a hammer "You doggone worry wart! Poundin' on a nut till it's buried inta th' table!" (etc.).

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pied a terre (n.)

"small town house or rooms used for short residences," 1829, French, pied à terre, literally "foot on the ground."

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van de Graaff 

in reference to an electrostatic charge generator, 1934, named for U.S. physicist R.J. van de Graaff (1901-1967).

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Double Dutch 

"gibberish, incomprehensible language," by 1847 (High Dutch for "incomprehensible language" is recorded by 1789); from double (adj.) + Dutch.

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American dream 

coined 1931 by James Truslow Adams (1878-1949), U.S. writer and popular historian (unrelated to the Massachusetts Adamses), in "Epic of America."

[The American Dream is] that dream of a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller for everyone, with opportunity for each according to ability or achievement. It is a difficult dream for the European upper classes to interpret adequately, and too many of us ourselves have grown weary and mistrustful of it. It is not a dream of motor cars and high wages merely, but a dream of social order in which each man and each woman shall be able to attain to the fullest stature of which they are innately capable, and be recognized by others for what they are, regardless of the fortuitous circumstances of birth or position. [Adams]

Others have used the term as they will.

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Arbor Day 

day set aside in U.S. "for planting forest trees to make lumber for the generations yet to come" ["Congressional Record," June 1892], first celebrated April 10, 1872, in Nebraska (a largely treeless state), the brainchild of U.S. agriculturalist and journalist J. Sterling Morton (1832-1902). From Latin arbor, arboris "tree" (see arbor (n.2)).

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