Etymology
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egotize (v.)
"talk overmuch of oneself," 1775, from ego + -ize.
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self-censorship (n.)

"censorship of oneself," by 1950; see self- + censorship

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self-awareness (n.)

"condition of being aware of oneself," 1876, from self- + awareness.

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self-conscious (adj.)

1680s, "aware of one's action or oneself," a word of the English Enlightenment (Locke was using it by 1690, along with self-consciousness "state of being aware of oneself, consciousness of one's own identity"), from self- + conscious. The morbid sense of "preoccupied with one's own personality, conscious of oneself as an object of observation to others" is attested by 1834 (J.S. Mill). Related: Self-consciously.

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chat (v.)

mid-15c., "talk idly, babble," short for chatter (v.). Meaning "to converse familiarly" is from 1550s. Sense of "flirt with, ingratiate oneself with" (later often with up (adv.)) is from 1898. Related: Chatted; chatting.

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helpless (adj.)
"unable to act for oneself," c. 1200, from help (n.) + -less. Related: Helplessly; helplessness. In Middle English and later sometimes "unable to give help, affording no help" (late 14c.), but this never was common.
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acquaint (v.)

early 13c., "make oneself known" (reflexive, now obsolete); early 14c., "to gain for oneself personal knowledge of," from Old French acointer "make known; make or seek acquaintance of," from Vulgar Latin *accognitare "to make known," from Latin accognitus "acquainted with," past participle of accognoscere "know well," from ad "to" (see ad-) + cognitus, past participle of cognoscere "come to know" (see cognizance).

Meaning "to inform (someone of something), furnish with knowledge or information" is from 1550s. Related: Acquainted; acquainting.

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shiftless (adj.)

"wanting in resources or energy and ability to shift for oneself, deficient in organizing or executive ability," 1580s, from shift (n.1) in the sense "resources" + -less. Also compare shift (v.). Related: Shiftlessly; shiftlessness.

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consuetude (n.)

late 14c., "custom, usage," from Old French consuetude and directly from Latin consuetudo "a being accustomed, habit, usage," from consuetus, past participle of consuescere "to accustom," from assimilated form of com-, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + suescere "become used to, accustom oneself," related to suus "oneself" (from PIE *swe- "oneself;" see idiom).

Meaning "that which one is accustomed to, habitual association" is from 1803. Related: Consuetudinal; consuetudinary.

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