Etymology
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marginal (adj.)

1570s, "written or printed on the margin of a page," from Medieval Latin marginalis, from Latin margo "edge, brink, border, margin" (see margin (n.)). Sense of "of little effect or importance" first recorded 1887. Related: Marginally.

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nacho (n.)

according to "The Dallas Morning News" [Oct. 22, 1995] and other sources, named for restaurant cook Ignacio Anaya, who invented the dish in the Mexican border town of Piedras Negras in 1943. The masc. given name is from Latin Ignatius.

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hem (v.)

late 14c., "to provide (something) with a border or fringe" (surname Hemmer attested from c. 1300), from hem (n.). Meaning "to enclose, circumscribe" is from 1530s. Related: Hemmed; hemming. The phrase hem in "shut in, confine," first recorded 1530s.

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target (n.)

c. 1300, "shield," diminutive of late Old English targe, from Old French targe "light shield" (12c.), from Frankish *targa "shield," from Proto-Germanic *targ- (source also of Old High German zarga "edging, border," German zarge "border, edge, frame," Old English targe, Old Norse targa "shield, buckler"), perhaps originally "edge of a shield." Meaning "round object to be aimed at in shooting" first recorded 1757, originally in archery, perhaps suggested by the concentric circles in both. Target-practice is from 1801. Target audience is by 1951; early reference is to Cold War psychological warfare.

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margrave (n.)

German title equivalent to count or earl, originally (from the time of Charlemagne) "military governor of a border province," but the office soon became hereditary in the Holy Roman Empire, 1550s, from Middle Dutch marcgrave (Dutch markgraaf), literally "count of the border," from Old High German marcgravo; second element from graf "count, earl" (Old High German gravo, gravjo), according to Boutkan a designation of rank that developed in Franconian, probably based on Medieval Latin -gravius, from Greek grapheus "scribe." For first element see mark (n.1). Equivalent of marquis. His wife was a margravine.

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margin (n.)

mid-14c., "edge of a sea or lake;" late 14c., of a written or printed paper, "space between a block of text and the edge of a leaf or sheet;" from Old French margin and directly from Latin marginem (nominative margo) "edge, brink, border, margin," from PIE root *merg- "boundary, border."

The general sense of "bordering space, boundary space, rim or edge" is from late 14c. Meaning "comfort allowance, cushion, scope, range, provision for enlarged or extended action" is by 1851; margin of error is attested by 1889. Stock market sense of "sum deposited with a broker to cover risk of loss" is from 1848. Related: Margins.

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contiguous (adj.)

"touching, meeting or joining at a surface or border," 1610s, from Latin contiguus "near, touching, bordering upon," from root of contingere "to touch upon" (see contact (n.)). Earlier form, now obsolete, was contiguate (mid-15c.); contigue (1540s). Related: Contiguously; contiguousness.

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listed (adj.)

"included in a roll or catalogue," 1882, from past participle of list (v.3). Of telephone numbers, "in the phone book," from 1919. Earlier "provided with a border" (mid-15c.), from list (n.2); from 1670s in reference to ground marked off for combat.

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brink (n.)

"edge or border of a steep place," early 13c., from Middle Low German brink "edge," or from a Scandinavian source akin to Danish brink "steepness, shore, bank, grassy edge," from Proto-Germanic *brenkon, probably from PIE *bhreng-, variant of *bhren- "to project; edge" (source also of Lithuanian brinkti "to swell").

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circumjacent (adj.)

"bordering on every side," late 15c., from Latin circumiacens, present participle of circumiacere "to border upon, to lie round about, enjoin," from circum "around, round about" (see circum-) + iacere "to throw, cast, hurl" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Related: Circumjacence; circumjacency.

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