Etymology
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Pyanepsia (n.)

festival in honor of Apollo on the 7th of Pyanepsion (fourth month of the Attic calendar, corresponding to October-November), from Greek Pyanepsia (plural), literally "the feast of cooking beans," from pyanos, variant of kyamos, name of a kind of bean, a word of unknown origin (perhaps foreign or Pre-Greek), + epsein "to boil, cook." At this festival a dish of pulse was offered to the god.

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bourn (n.1)
also bourne, "small stream," especially of the winter torrents of the chalk downs, Old English brunna, burna "brook, stream," from Proto-Germanic *brunnoz "spring, fountain" (source also of Old High German brunno, Old Norse brunnr, Old Frisian burna, German Brunnen "fountain," Gothis brunna "well"), ultimately from PIE root *bhreu- "to boil, bubble, effervesce, burn." The southern England form of northern burn.
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blot (n.)

late 14c., "a spot or stain of ink;" also "a moral stain or blemish, a disgrace, a sin;" of uncertain origin. Perhaps from Old Norse blettr "blot, stain," or from Old French blot, variant of bloc "block." The Middle English Compendium compares, hesitantly, Old French blo(s)tre, variant of blestre "a boil." From 1570s as "any black or dark patch."

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concoction (n.)

1530s, "digestion" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin concoctionem (nominative concoctio) "digestion," noun of action from past participle stem of concoquere "to digest; to boil together, prepare; to consider well," from assimilated form of com "together" (see con-) + coquere "to cook, prepare food, ripen, digest," from PIE root *pekw- "to cook, ripen."

Meaning "that which is concocted" is by 1850, figurative; meaning "a devising, a planning, act of preparing and combining the materials of anything" is from 1823.

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decoction (n.)

late 14c., decoccioun, "liquor in which an animal or vegetable substance has been boiled;" early 15c., "act of boiling in water," from Old French décoction (13c.) or directly from Latin decoctionem (nominative decoctio) "a boiling down," noun of action from past-participle stem of decoquere "to boil down," from de "down" (see de-) + coquere "to cook" (from PIE root *pekw- "to cook, ripen").

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push (n.)

1560s, "a driving or impelling thrust," from push (v.). By 1590s as "a vigorous attempt." By 1803 as "a determined advance, a pushing forward." The sense of "persevering enterprise, a determined effort to get on" especially if inconsiderate of others is by 1855. Phrase when push comes to shove "when action must back up threats" is by 1936. An earlier Middle English noun push "a pustule, pimple, boil" probably is from pus by influence of push.

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concoct (v.)

1530s, "to digest" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin concoctus, past participle of concoquere "to digest; to boil together, prepare; to consider well," from assimilated form of com "together" (see con-) + coquere "to cook, prepare food, ripen, digest," from PIE root *pekw- "to cook, ripen."

Meaning "to prepare an edible thing, combine and prepare the elements of" is from 1670s, metaphorically extended beyond cooking to "devise, plan" by 1792. Related: Concocted; concocting.

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broil (v.2)
early 15c., "to quarrel, brawl," also "mix up, present in disorder," from Anglo-French broiller "mix up, confuse," Old French brooillier "to mix, mingle," figuratively "to have sexual intercourse" (13c., Modern French brouiller), perhaps from breu, bro "stock, broth, brew," from Frankish or another Germanic source (compare Old High German brod "broth"), from PIE root *bhreu- "to boil, bubble, effervesce, burn." Compare Italian brogliare "to stir, disorder" (see imbroglio).
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samovar (n.)

"copper urn, used in Russia and nearby regions, in which water is kept boiling for use as needed in making tea," 1830, from Russian samovar, literally "self-boiler," from sam "self" (from PIE root *sem- (1) "one; as one, together with") + varit "to boil" (from Old Church Slavonic variti "to cook," from PIE root *wer- "to burn"); but this is perhaps folk-etymology if the word is from Tatar sanabar "tea-urn."

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brood (n.)
Old English brod "offspring of egg-laying animals, hatchlings, young birds hatched in one nest," from Proto-Germanic *brod (source also of Middle Dutch broet, Old High German bruot, German Brut "brood"), etymologically "that which is hatched by heat," from *bro- "to warm, heat," from PIE *bhre- "burn, heat, incubate," from root *bhreu- "to boil, bubble, effervesce, burn." Meaning "human offspring, children of one family" is from c. 1300.
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