Etymology
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bluish (adj.)
"somewhat blue," late 14c., blewysh; see blue (adj.1) + -ish.
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lunation (n.)
"time from one new moon to the next," late 14c., from Medieval Latin lunationem, from Latin luna "moon" (see luna).
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moonlight (n.)

"light of the moon," c. 1300, from moon (n.) + light (n.). Similar formation in Dutch maanlicht, German Mondlicht.

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moonrace (n.)
also moon race, "national rivalry to be first to send humans to the moon," 1963, from moon (n.) + race (n.1).
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lunette (n.)

1570s, "semi-circular partial horseshoe," from French lunette (13c.), literally "little moon," diminutive of lune "moon," from Latin luna (see luna). Later applied to a wide range of objects and ornamentations resembling more or less a crescent moon.

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blueberry (n.)
also blue-berry, fruit of several species of Vaccinium, c. 1775, from blue (adj.1) + berry.
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bleu 
French form of blue (1), used from c. 1890 in names of various French blue cheeses (French fromage bleu) marketed in Britain and U.S.
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blueing (n.)
"substance which makes (something) blue," 1660s, verbal noun from blue (v.).
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moonglow (n.)

"the light or glow of the moon," 1926, from moon (n.) + glow (n.).

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bluebird (n.)
also blue-bird, North American warbler-like bird, 1680s, from blue (adj.1) in reference to the chief color of its plumage + bird (n.1). Figurative use in bluebird of happiness is from 1909 play romance "l'Oiseau bleu," literally "The Blue Bird," by Belgian dramatist and poet Maurice Maeterlinck (1862-1949).
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