Etymology
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thrombo- 
before vowels thromb-, word-forming element meaning "blood clot," from combining form of Greek thrombos "clot of blood" (see thrombus).
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Rh factor 
1942, from the first letters of rhesus; so called because the blood group, and its effects, were discovered in the blood of rhesus monkeys (1941).
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perturb (v.)

late 14c., perturben, "disturb greatly, disturb mentally; cause disorder in," from Old French perturber "disturb, confuse" (14c.) and directly from Latin perturbare "to confuse, disorder, disturb," especially of states of the mind, from per "through" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "through") + turbare "disturb, confuse," from turba "turmoil, crowd" (see turbid). Related: Perturbed; perturbing.

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*kreue- 

*kreuə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "raw flesh."

It forms all or part of: 

creatine; creosote; crude; cruel; ecru; pancreas; raw; recrudesce; recrudescence.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit kravis- "raw flesh," krura- "raw, bloody;" Greek kreas "flesh;" Latin crudus "bloody, raw; cruel," cruor "thick blood;" Old Irish cru "gore, blood," Middle Irish cruaid "hardy, harsh, stern;" Old Church Slavonic kry "blood;" Old Prussian krawian, Lithuanian kraūjas "blood;" Old English hreaw "raw," hrot "thick fluid, serum."

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bloodhound (n.)
also blood-hound, type of large dog used in hunting, c. 1300, from blood (n.) + hound (n.). It traces wounded prey by the scent of the blood it has spilled, or any other trace. Similar formation in Dutch bloedhond, German Bluthund.
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toxemia (n.)
"blood-poisoning," also toxaemia, 1848, from toxo- (before vowels tox-, from Greek toxon; see toxic) + -emia (from Greek haima "blood").
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indisposition (n.)
early 15c., "unfavorable influence" (in astrology), mid-15c., "disinclination (to), state of being not disposed in mind," from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + disposition. Perhaps modeled on Old French indisposicion or Medieval Latin indispositio. Sense of "ill health, disorder of the mind or body" is from mid-15c. Other 15c. senses included "inclination to evil; wickedness," and "public disorder, lawlessness."
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disarray (n.)

late 14c., "disorder, confusion, condition of being out of regular order," from dis- "opposite of" + array (n.) "order, arrangement, sequence," or perhaps from Old French desarroi.

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bleed (v.)
Old English bledan, "to cause to lose blood, to let blood" (in Middle English and after, especially "to let blood from surgically"), also (intrans.) "to emit blood," from Proto-Germanic *blodjan "emit blood" (source also of Old Norse blæða, Dutch bloeden, German bluten), from PIE *bhlo-to- "swell, gush, spurt," or "that which bursts out," from suffixed form of root *bhel- (3) "to thrive, bloom."

Meaning "extort money from" is from 1670s. Of dyes or paints, "to be washed out," from 1862. Figuratively, of the heart, "to suffer anguish, feel pity or sorrow," late 14c.
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disturb (v.)

late 13c. distourben, "to frighten, alarm, break up the tranquility of;" c. 1300, "to stop or hinder;" from Old French destorber (Old North French distourber) and directly from Latin disturbare "throw into disorder," from dis- "completely" (see dis-) + turbare "to disorder, disturb," from turba "turmoil" (see turbid). Related: Disturbed; disturbing; disturbingly.

Middle English also had the verb as distourblen, from Old French destorbler; hence also distourbler (n.) "one who disturbs or incites" (late 14c.).

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