Etymology
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mouse-hole (n.)

"very small hole where mice go in and out, a hole only big enough to admit a mouse," early 15c., from mouse (n.) + hole (n.).

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mud-hole (n.)

also mudhole, "place full of mud," 1760, from mud (n.) + hole (n.).

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pin-hole (n.)

"small hole made by the puncture of a pin," 1670s, from pin (n.) + hole (n.). By 1891 in reference to a type of camera using a pin-hole in place of a lens.

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black-tie (n.)
as an article of male attire, 1848, from black (adj.) + tie (n.). As an adjective, indicating the style of formal attire that features it, or situations where such is the proper dress, by 1933.
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coal-black (adj.)

"black as coal," mid-13c., from coal (n.) + black (adj.).

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hole-in-the-wall (n.)
"small and unpretentious place," 1816, perhaps recalling the hole in the wall that was a public house name in England from at least 1690s. "Generally it is believed to refer to some snug corner, perhaps near the town walls," but the common story was that it referred to "the hole made in the wall of the debtors' or other prisons, through which the poor prisoners received the money, broken meat, or other donations of the charitably inclined" [Jacob Larwood and John Camden Hotten, "The History of Signboards: From the Earliest Times to the Present Day," 1867]. Mid-19c. it was the name of the private liquor bar attached to the U.S. Congress.
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wormhole (n.)
also worm-hole, 1590s, "hole made by a burrowing insect" (in fruit, timber, etc.), from worm (n.) + hole (n.). Astrophysics sense is attested from 1957.
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eyehole (n.)

also eye-hole, 1630s, "cavity or socket containing the orbit of the eye," from eye (n.) + hole (n.). By 1856 as "hole or opening, as in a mask or in a curtain or door, through which one may look, a peep hole."  

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sinkhole (n.)
also sink-hole, mid-15c., "sewage pit," from sink (n.) + hole (n.). As a geological phenomenon, "hole made in the earth in limestone regions by underground erosion," 1780, from sink (v.).
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foraminous (adj.)
"full of holes," 1620s, from Late Latin foraminosus, from Latin foramen "hole, opening" (from PIE root *bhorh- "hole").
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