Etymology
Advertisement
foal (v.)
"give birth (to a foal)," late 14c., from foal (n.). Related: Foaled; foaling.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
epigone (n.)
also epigon, "undistinguished scion of mighty ancestors," (sometimes in Latin plural form epigoni), 1865, from Greek epigonoi, in classical use with reference to the sons of the Seven who warred against Thebes; plural of epigonos "offspring, successor, posterity," noun use of adjective meaning "born afterward," from epi "close upon" (in time), see epi-, + -gonos "birth, offspring," from root of gignesthai "to be born" related to genos "race, birth, descent" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups).
Related entries & more 
Antigone 
daughter of Oedipus, her name in Greek might mean "in place of a mother," from anti "opposite, in place of" (see anti-) + gone "womb, childbirth, generation," from root of gignesthai "to be born" related to genos "race, birth, descent" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups).
Related entries & more 
nulliparous (adj.)

"having never given birth," 1837, from medical Latin nullipara "woman (especially one not a virgin) who has never given birth," from nulli-, stem of nullus "no" (see null) + -para, fem. of parus, from parire "to bring forth" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure") + -ous.

Related entries & more 
first-born (adj., n.)

"first in order of birth," as a noun, "first-born child," mid-14c., from first (adj.) + born.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
genus (n.)

(Latin plural genera), 1550s as a term of logic, "kind or class of things" (biological sense dates from c. 1600), from Latin genus (genitive generis) "race, stock, kind; family, birth, descent, origin" (from suffixed form of PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups).

Related entries & more 
congenital (adj.)
Origin and meaning of congenital

"existing from birth," 1796, from Latin congenitus "born or produced together," from assimilated form of com "together, with" (see con-) + genitus, past participle of gignere "to beget" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget"). This sense formerly belonged to congenial (which is attested from 1660s with this meaning). Related: Congenitally.

Related entries & more 
ante-partum (adj.)

also antepartum, "occurring or existing before birth," 1908, from Latin phrase ante partum "before birth," from ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before") + accusative of partus "a bearing, a bringing forth," from partus, past participle of parire "to bring forth" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure").

Related entries & more 
oogenesis (n.)

"formation and development of the ovum," by 1890, from oo- "egg"+ -genesis "birth, origin, creation." Related: Oogenetic.

Related entries & more 
Eugenia 
fem. proper name, from Latin, from Greek Eugenia, literally "nobility of birth," fem. of Eugenius (see Eugene).
Related entries & more 

Page 5