Etymology
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generous (adj.)

1580s, "of noble birth," from French généreux (14c.), from Latin generosus "of noble birth," figuratively "magnanimous, generous," from genus (genitive generis) "race, stock" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget," with derivatives referring to procreation and familial and tribal groups). Secondary senses of "unselfish" (1690s) and "plentiful" (1610s) in English were present in French and in Latin. Related: Generously; generousness.

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angiogenesis (n.)

"development of new blood vessels," 1896, from angio- + -genesis "birth, origin, creation."

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burd (n.)

poetic word for "woman, lady" in old ballads; later "young lady, maiden;" c. 1200, perhaps from Old English byrde "wealthy, well-born, of good birth" (compare Old English gebyrd "birth, descent, race; offspring; nature; fate;" see birth (n.)) Or a metathesis of bryd "bride" (see bride). The masculine equivalent was berne.

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controllable (adj.)

"capable of being checked or restrained," c. 1600, from control (v.) + -able.

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receivership (n.)

late 15c., "office of a receiver of public revenues," from receiver + -ship. As "condition of being under control of a receiver," 1884.

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multiparous (adj.)

"bringing forth many young at a birth," 1640s, from Modern Latin multiparus "giving or having given birth to many," from multi- "many" + stem of parire "to bring forth" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure"). Related: Multiparity.

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dominance (n.)

"rule, control; authority; ascendancy," 1819; see dominant + -ance. Perhaps from French dominance (by 1743). Related: Dominancy.

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self-discipline (n.)

"ability to restrain or guide or control oneself," 1690s; see self- + discipline (n.). Related: Self-disciplined.

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high-born (adj.)

also highborn, "of noble birth," c. 1300, from high (adv.) + born.

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joy-stick (n.)

also joystick, 1910, aviators' slang for the control lever of an airplane, from joy + stick (n.). Transferred sense of "small lever to control movement" is from 1952; later especially in reference to controlling images on a screen (1978). As slang for "dildo," probably from early 1930s.

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