Etymology
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morphogenesis (n.)

1863 in biology, "the production of the form or shape of an organism," from German (by 1844); see  morpho- "form" + -genesis "birth, origin, creation." By 1958 in geology, "the formation of landscapes." Related: Morphogenetic.

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integument (n.)

1610s, from Latin integumentum "a covering," from integere "to cover over," from in- "in, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + tegere "to cover" (from PIE root *(s)teg- "to cover"). Specific sense in biology is from 1660s.

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pubescent (adj.)

1610s, "arriving at puberty," a back-formation from pubescence or else from French pubescent (early 16c.) or directly from Latin pubescentem (nominative pubescens), present participle of pubescere "to reach puberty." By 1760  in biology, "covered with fine short hairs or down."

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feminism (n.)
1851, "qualities of females;" 1895, "advocacy of women's rights;" from French féminisme (1837); see feminine + -ism. Also, in biology, "development of female secondary sexual characteristics in a male" (1875).
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asexual (adj.)
1829, as a term in biology, "having no sex or sexual system," a hybrid from a- (3) "not" + sexual. In general contexts, "wanting sexuality, being of or referring to neither sex," attested from 1896.
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reticulum (n.)

1650s, "second stomach of a ruminant" (so called from the folds of the membrane), from Latin reticulum "a little net" (see rete). The word was later given various uses in biology, cytology, histology, etc., and made a southern constellation by La Caille (1763).

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anencephalic (adj.)

"having no brain" (biology), 1821, with -ic + Latinized form of Greek anenkephalos, from an- "not, without" (see an- (1)) + enkephalos "brain," "the brain," literally "within the head," from en "in" (see en- (2)) + kephalē "head;" see cephalo-. Related: Anencephalous (1834); anencephalia; anencephaly.

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plasm (n.)

1610s, "mold or matrix in which anything is cast or formed to a particular shape" (a sense now obsolete); see plasma. In biology, the meaning "living matter of a cell, protoplasm" is attested by 1864.

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biometry (n.)
1831, "calculation of life expectancy" (obsolete); see bio- + -metry. Coined by Whewell, popularized 1860s by T.S. Lambert. Later, "application of mathematics to the study of biology" (1894). Related: Biometer, used in various senses from 1830s; from 1865 as "life table," calculating the duration of life under given conditions.
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dyad (n.)

"the number two, two units treated as one," 1670s, from Latin dyad-, stem of dyas, from Greek dyas "the number two, a group of two," from duo "two" (from PIE root *dwo- "two"). Specific sense in chemistry ("a bivalent element") is by 1865; also used in biology, poetics, mathematics. Related: Dyadic.

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