Etymology
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-aceous 
word-forming element denoting "belonging to, of the nature of," from Latin -aceus, enlarged form of adjectival suffix -ax (genitive -acis); see -acea. Especially in biology, "pertaining to X order of plants or animals."
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Reptilia (n.)

in biology, the class of cold-blooded, scaled vertebrates including the reptiles proper, mid-17c., from Latin plural of reptile (see reptile; also see -a (2)).

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convergent (adj.)

"tending to meet or actually meeting in a point," 1730, from converge + -ent. Convergent evolution was in use among biologists by 1890 (convergence in evolutionary biology dates to 1866).

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punctate (adj.)

"dotted, pointed, marked with dots," 1760, from Modern Latin punctuatus, from Latin punctum "a point" (from nasalized form of PIE root *peuk- "to prick"). Especially in biology, "having dots scattered over the surface." Related: Punctation.

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morphogenesis (n.)

1863 in biology, "the production of the form or shape of an organism," from German (by 1844); see  morpho- "form" + -genesis "birth, origin, creation." By 1958 in geology, "the formation of landscapes." Related: Morphogenetic.

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integument (n.)

1610s, from Latin integumentum "a covering," from integere "to cover over," from in- "in, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + tegere "to cover" (from PIE root *(s)teg- "to cover"). Specific sense in biology is from 1660s.

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asexual (adj.)
1829, as a term in biology, "having no sex or sexual system," a hybrid from a- (3) "not" + sexual. In general contexts, "wanting sexuality, being of or referring to neither sex," attested from 1896.
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pubescent (adj.)

1610s, "arriving at puberty," a back-formation from pubescence or else from French pubescent (early 16c.) or directly from Latin pubescentem (nominative pubescens), present participle of pubescere "to reach puberty." By 1760  in biology, "covered with fine short hairs or down."

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phanero- 

before vowels phaner-, word-forming element meaning "visible, manifest," especially from 18c. in biology, from Greek phaneros "visible, manifest, evident, apparent," from phainein "bring to light, cause to appear, show," from PIE root *bha- (1) "to shine." Opposed to crypto-.

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sematic (adj.)

"significant, indicative, serving as a sign or warning" (as of danger), 1855, from Greek sēmat-, combining form of sēma (genitive sematos) "sign" (see semantic) + -ic. Used especially in biology, in reference to "warning" colors, etc. (by 1890).

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