Etymology
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ligature (n.)

c. 1400, "something used in tying or binding," from Late Latin ligatura "a band," from Latin ligatus, past participle of ligare "to bind" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind"). In modern musical notation, "group of notes slurred together," from 1590s; of letters joined in printing or writing from 1690s.

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annexation (n.)

1610s, "that which is added;" 1620s, "union" (now obsolete); 1630s, "action of adding to the end or adding a smaller to a greater," from Medieval Latin annexiationem (nominative annexatio) "action of annexing," noun of action from past-participle stem of annexare "to bind to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + nectere "to tie, bind" (from PIE root *ned- "to bind, tie"). The Middle English noun form was annexion "union; joining; territory acquired" (mid-15c.).

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asyndeton (n.)

"figure of speech consisting of omission of conjunctions," 1580s, from Latin, from Greek asyndeton, neuter of asyndetos "unconnected," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + syndetos, from syndein "to bind together," from syn- "together" (see syn-) + dein "to bind," related to desmos "band," from PIE root *dē- "to bind" (see diadem).

"I pitied thee, Took pains to make thee speak, taught thee each hour One thing or other." ["The Tempest"]
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sinew (n.)

Old English seonowe, oblique form of nominative sionu "sinew," from Proto-Germanic *sinwō (source also of Old Saxon sinewa, Old Norse sina, Old Frisian sine, Middle Dutch senuwe, Dutch zenuw, Old High German senawa, German Sehne), from PIE root *sai- "to tie, bind" (source also of Sanskrit snavah "sinew," syati, sinati "to bind;" Avestan snavar, Irish sin "chain;" Hittite ishai-/ishi- "to bind").

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*leig- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to tie, bind." 

It forms all or part of: alloy; ally; colligate; deligate; furl; league (n.1) "alliance;" legato; liable; liaison; lien; lictor; ligand; ligament; ligate; ligation; ligature; oblige; rally (v.1) "bring together;" religion; rely.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin ligare "to bind;" Albanian lidh "I bind," and possibly Middle Low German lik "band," Middle High German geleich "joint, limb."

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ligation (n.)

"a tying or binding, as with a ligature," 1590s, from French ligation, from Late Latin ligationem (nominative ligatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of ligare "to bind" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind"). Liaison is the same word in French form.

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apprentice (v.)
"to bind to a master for instruction in his craft," 1630s, from apprentice (n.). Related: Apprenticed; apprenticing.
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lien (n.)

"right to hold property of another until debt is paid," 1530s, from French lien "a band or tie" (12c.), from Latin ligamen "bond," from ligare "to bind, tie" (from PIE root *leig- "to tie, bind"). The word was in Middle English in the literal sense "a bond, fetter," also figuratively, "moral restraint."

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bundle (n.)
early 14c., "bound collection of things," from Middle Dutch bondel, diminutive of bond, from binden "to bind," or perhaps a merger of this word and Old English byndele "binding," from Proto-Germanic *bund- (source also of German bündel "to bundle"), from PIE root *bhendh- "to bind." Meaning "a lot of money" is from 1899. To be a bundle of nerves "very anxious" is from 1938.
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diadem (n.)

c. 1300, diademe, "aureole of a martyr or confessor;" mid-14c., "a crown, anything worn on the head as a mark of royalty," from Old French diademe and directly from Latin diadema "cloth band worn around the head as a sign of royalty," from Greek diadema "the headband worn by Persian kings and adopted by Alexander the Great and his successors," from diadein "to bind across," from dia "across" or "through" (see dia-) + dein "to bind," which is related to desmos "band," from PIE root *dē- "to bind." Related: Diademed.

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