Etymology
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mundungus (n.)

"tobacco with an offensive odor," 1640s, from Spanish mondongo "paunch, tripe, intestines," related to modejo "paunch, belly (of a pig)."

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heh (interj.)

mid-15c., originally an exclamation of emotions such as sorrow or surprise. As the sound of a light laugh by 1808.

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guffaw (n.)

1720, Scottish, probably imitative of the sound of coarse laughter. Compare gawf (early 16c.) "loud, noisy laugh." The verb is from 1721. Related: Guffawed; guffawing.

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snicker (v.)

"laugh in a half-suppressed way," 1690s, possibly of imitative origin, similar to Dutch snikken "to gasp, sob." Related: Snickered; snickering.

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hee-haw 

also heehaw, attested by 1815 (as Hiu Haw), probably imitative of sound of donkey's bray (compare French hinham). As "a loud laugh" from 1843.

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cackle (n.)

1670s, "sound made by a hen or goose," from cackle (v.). From 1856 as "a short laugh." Cackleberries, slang for "eggs" is recorded from 1880.

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abdomen (n.)
Origin and meaning of abdomen

1540s, "flesh or meat of the belly" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin abdomen "the belly," a word of unknown origin, Perhaps [OED, Watkins] from abdere "conceal" (from ab "off, away" + PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"), with a sense of "concealment of the viscera," or else "what is concealed" by proper dress. De Vaan, however, finds this derivation "unfounded." Anatomical sense of "part of the mammalian body between the diaphragm and the pelvis" is from 1610s. Zoological sense of "posterior division of the bodies of arthropods" is by 1725.

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derisory (adj.)

"characterized by mocking or ridicule," 1610s, from Latin derisorius, from derisor "derider," agent noun from deridere "to ridicule," from de "down" (see de-) + ridere "to laugh" (see risible).

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epigastrium (n.)

1680s, Modern Latin, from Greek epigastrion "region of the abdomen from the breasts to the navel," neuter of epigastrios "over the belly," from epi "on, above" (see epi-) + gaster "stomach" (see gastric). The region below the navel is the hypogastrium.

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zill (n.)

"brass finger cymbal used (four at a time) by belly-dancers in certain performances," by 1976, from Turkish zil "cymbal." Related: Zills.

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