Etymology
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of- 
assimilated form of ob- before -f-.
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op- 
assimilated form of ob- before -p-.
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sus- 
assimilated form of sub- before -s-.
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dif- 

assimilated form of dis- before -f-.

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ante (n.)
in the game of poker, "stake of money placed in a pool by each player before drawing cards," 1838, American English poker slang, apparently from Latin ante "before" (from PIE root *ant- "front, forehead," with derivatives meaning "in front of, before"). From 1846 as a verb.
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gran (2)
Italian, the form of grand before nouns.
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sum- 
assimilated form of sub- before -m-.
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sur- (2)
assimilated form of sub- before -r-.
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preposition (n.)

late 14c., preposicioun, in grammar, "indeclinable part of speech regularly placed before and governing a noun in an oblique case and showing its relation to a verb, adjective, or other noun," from Latin praepositionem (nominative praepositio) "a putting before, a prefixing," noun of action from past-participle stem of praeponere "put before," from prae "before" (see pre-) + ponere "put, set, place" (past participle positus; see position (n.)). In grammatical use, a loan-translation of Greek prothesis, literally "a setting before." Old English used foresetnys as a loan-translation of Latin praepositio.

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praetor (n.)
elected magistrate in ancient Rome (subordinate to consuls), early 15c., from Latin praetor "one who goes before;" originally "a consul as leader of an army," from prae "before" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "in front of, before") + root of ire "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go").
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