Etymology
Advertisement
fructify (v.)
mid-14c., "bear fruit," from Old French fructifiier "bear fruit, grow, develop" (12c.), from Late Latin fructificare "bear fruit," from Latin fructus "fruit, crops; profit, enjoyment" (from PIE root *bhrug- "to enjoy," with derivatives referring to agricultural products) + combining form of facere "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Transitive use from 1580s. Related: Fructified; fructifying; fructification.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
smokey (adj.)
variant of smoky. As a noun, sometimes short for Smokey Bear.
Related entries & more 
tolerant (adj.)
1784, "free from bigotry or severity in judging others," from French tolérant (16c.), and directly from Latin tolerantem (nominative tolerans), present participle of tolerare "to bear, endure, tolerate" (see toleration). Meaning "able to bear (something) without being affected" is from 1879. Related: Tolerantly.
Related entries & more 
Cuffy 

also Cuffee, a characteristic name among slaves, by 1713. Also sometimes in 19c. "a black bear."

Related entries & more 
odoriferous (adj.)
early 15c., "that has a scent," with -ous + Latin odorifer "spreading odor, fragrant," literally "bearing odor," from odor "a smell, a scent" (see odor) + ferre "to bear, carry," from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry," also "to bear children." Usually in a positive sense.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
grizzly (adj.)
"somewhat gray," 1590s, from grizzle "gray-colored" + -y (1). Also see grizzled. Grizzly bear (ursus horribilis) for the large ferocious bear of the western U.S., is recorded by 1806; sometimes said to belong rather to grisly (q.v.), but either adjective suits it.
Related entries & more 
Orson 
masc. proper name, from French ourson, diminutive of ours "bear," from Latin ursus (see arctic).
Related entries & more 
Ursa 
in constellation names, Old English, from Latin ursa "she-bear" (see ursine).
Related entries & more 
Beowulf 
Old English beo wulf, literally "bee-wolf," "a wolf to bees;" a kenning for "bear." See bee (n.) + wolf (n.).
Related entries & more 
endurance (n.)
late 15c., "continued existence in time;" see endure + -ance. Meaning "ability to bear suffering, etc." is from 1660s.
Related entries & more 

Page 5