Etymology
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becalm (v.)

1550s in the nautical use, "deprive a ship of wind," from be- + calm. The meaning "make calm or still" is from 1610s. Related: Becalmed; becalming.

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besmear (v.)

Old English bismierwan, besmyrwan (West Saxon), besmerwan (Anglian); see be- + smear (v.). Related: Besmeared; besmearing.

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bestow (v.)

early 14c., bistowen "give, confer" (alms, etc.), from be- + stowen "to place" (see stow). Related: Bestowed; bestowing; bestower.

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beweep (v.)

Old English bewepan "to weep over," cognate with Old Frisian biwepa, Old Saxon biwopian; see be- + weep. Related: Bewept.

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betimes (adv.)

early 14c., "at an early period;" late 14c., "seasonably, before it is too late," from betime (c. 1300, from be- + time (n.)). With adverbial genitive -s.

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beguile (v.)

"delude by artifice," early 13c., from be- + guile (v.). The meaning "entertain with pastimes" is by 1580s (compare the sense evolution of amuse). Related: Beguiled; beguiling.

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bemoan (v.)

Middle English bimonen, from late Old English bemænan "to express sorrow for, wail, lament;" see be- + moan (v.). Related: Bemoaned; bemoaning.

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bemuse (v.)

"to make utterly confused, put into muse or reverie, muddle, stupefy," from be- + muse (compare amuse); attested from 1735 but probably older, as Pope (1705) punned on it as "devoted utterly to the Muses."

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befuddle (v.)

1873, "confuse," originally "to confuse with strong drink or opium" (by 1832), from be- + fuddle. An earlier word in the same sense was begunk (1725). Related: Befuddled; befuddling.

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beknow (v.)

c. 1300, "to become acquainted with; to be aware or conscious of" (obsolete), from Old English becnawan "to know," or a Middle English formation from be- + know (v.). Related: Beknown; beknowing.

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