Etymology
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grounder (n.)
c. 1400, "one who establishes," agent noun from ground (v.). Baseball sense attested by 1867; earlier in cricket.
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spitball (n.)
1846 in the schoolboy sense, "bit of paper chewed and rounded as a missile;" 1904 in the baseball sense, from spit (n.1) + ball (n.1).
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infield (n.)
1733, "land of a farm which lies nearest the homestead," from in (adv.) + field (n.). Baseball diamond sense first attested 1866. Related: Infielder (1867).
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club-house (n.)

also clubhouse, "place of meeting and refreshment always open to those who are members of the club," 1805, from club (n.) in the associative sense + house (n.). Clubhouse lawyer is baseball slang by 1940s.

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misplay (n.)

"a wrong play," 1889 in baseball context, from mis- (1) "bad, wrong" + play (n.). As a verb from 1824 (originally in music; 1842 in games). Related: Misplayed; misplaying.

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shutout (n.)

also shut-out, 1889 in sports (baseball), "game in which one side does not score," from the verbal phrase shut out "exclude from a situation, deny (someone) right of entry to a place" (late 14c.), attested from 1881 in the sports sense of "not allow (the other team) to score any runs in a full game" (baseball); from shut (v.) + out (adv.). Middle English had a verb outshut "to shut out, exclude," mid-15c.

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big-league (adj.)
"prominent, important, first-rate," by 1925, a figurative use from baseball, where big league was used for "a major league" by 1891. See league (n.1).
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steal (n.)
1825, "act or case of theft," from steal (v.). Meaning "a bargain" is attested by 1942, American English colloquial. Baseball sense of "a stolen base" is from 1867.
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hit-and-run (adj.)
1940, in reference to military raids, etc., from hit (v.) + run (v.). As a noun phrase, Hit and run is from 1899 as a baseball play, 1924 as a driver failing to stop at an automobile accident he caused.
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