Etymology
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backbencher (n.)
1897 in a parliamentary context (originally Canadian), from back bench (1874 in this sense), from back (adj.) + bench (n.); occupants of the rear seats being the least-prominent politicians.
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liftback (n.)
in reference to a type of hatchback automobile, 1973, from lift (v.) + back (n.).
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backlash (n.)
1815, of machinery, "reaction of wheels on each other produced by an inconstant load," from back (adj.) + lash (n.) "a blow, stroke." In metaphoric sense, it is attested from 1929.
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backslide (v.)
in the religious sense "abandon faith or devotions, apostatize," 1580s, from back (adv.) + slide (v.). Related: Backslider; backsliding (1550s).
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drawback (n.)
"hindrance, disadvantage,"1720, from draw (v.) + back (adv.). The notion is of something that "holds back" success or activity.
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backwash (n.)

1861, "motion of a receding wave;" see back (adv.) + wash (v.). As "residue in a glass or bottle of beer after drinking most of it," by 1897.

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bareback (adj.)
"riding or performing on an unsaddled ('bare-backed') horse," 1560s, from bare (adj.) + back (n.).
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switchback (n.)
in reference to zig-zag railways, 1863, from switch (v.) + back (adv.). As an adjective from 1873.
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playback (n.)

"reproduction of a recording," 1929, from the verbal phrase; see play (v.) + back (adv.).

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wetback (n.)
"illegal Mexican immigrant to the U.S.," c. 1924, from wet (adj.) + back (n.); from notion of wading the Rio Grande.
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