Etymology
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backstage (n.)

also back-stage, "the area of a theater out of view of the audience," especially in the wings or dressing rooms, 1891; see back (adj.) + stage (n.).

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backstitch (n.)
also back-stitch, 1610s, from back (adj.) + stitch (n.). So called because each stitch doubles back on the preceding one. As a verb from 1720.
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fullback (n.)
also full-back, 1882 in sports, from full (adj.) + back (n.).
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paperback (n.)

"book with a paper cover," 1899, from paper (n.) + back (n.).

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liftback (n.)
in reference to a type of hatchback automobile, 1973, from lift (v.) + back (n.).
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backlash (n.)
1815, of machinery, "reaction of wheels on each other produced by an inconstant load," from back (adj.) + lash (n.) "a blow, stroke." In metaphoric sense, it is attested from 1929.
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backside (n.)
"the rear part of anything," c. 1400, from back (adj.) + side (n.). In the specific sense of "rump of an animal, buttocks" it is recorded by c. 1500.
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backbencher (n.)
1897 in a parliamentary context (originally Canadian), from back bench (1874 in this sense), from back (adj.) + bench (n.); occupants of the rear seats being the least-prominent politicians.
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backslide (v.)
in the religious sense "abandon faith or devotions, apostatize," 1580s, from back (adv.) + slide (v.). Related: Backslider; backsliding (1550s).
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drawback (n.)
"hindrance, disadvantage,"1720, from draw (v.) + back (adv.). The notion is of something that "holds back" success or activity.
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