Etymology
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cogency (n.)

"power of producing belief, quality of being highly probable or convincing," 1680s, from cogent + abstract noun suffix -cy.

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constituency (n.)

"body of constituents," especially "a body of persons voting for an elective officer," 1806, from constituent + abstract noun suffix -cy.

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rampancy (n.)

"state or quality of being rampant, exuberance, extravagance," 1660s, from rampant + abstract noun suffix -cy.

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profligacy (n.)

"shameless dissipation; the character or condition of being profligate," 1670s, from profligate + abstract noun suffix -cy.

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brilliancy (n.)
"quality of being brilliant," 1747; see brilliant + abstract noun suffix -cy. Also compare brilliance.
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aphonia (n.)
in pathology, "want of voice, loss of voice through some physical condition," 1778, from medical Latin aphonia, from Greek aphonia "speechlessness," abstract noun from aphonos "voiceless," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + phone "voice," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say" + abstract noun ending (see -ia). Englished form aphony is attested from 1680s.
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hyperthermia (n.)
1878, medical Latin, from hyper- "over, exceedingly, to excess" + Greek therme "heat" (see thermal) + abstract noun ending -ia.
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illiteracy (n.)
1650s, "inability to read and write," from illiterate + abstract noun suffix -cy. Earlier in this sense was illiterature (1590s).
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literacy (n.)
"ability to read and write," 1883, from literate + abstract noun suffix -cy. Illiteracy, however, dates back to 17c.
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accuracy (n.)
"state of being extremely precise or exact; conformity to truth," 1660s, from accurate + abstract noun suffix -cy.
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