Etymology
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eirenic (adj.)

"tending toward or productive of peace," 1866, from Greek eirēnikos, from eirēnē "peace, time of peace," a word of unknown etymology. Earlier as irenic (1864), irenical (1650s).

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frog (n.2)

type of fastening for clothing, 1719, originally a belt loop for carrying a weapon, of unknown origin; perhaps from Portuguese froco, from Latin floccus "tuft of wool," a word of unknown etymology.

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Lilith 
female evil spirit, in medieval Hebrew folklore the first wife of Adam, from Hebrew Lilith, from Akkadian Lilitu, which is connected by folk etymology with Hebrew laylah "night."
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malamute (n.)

also malemute, type of large Eskimo dog, 1874, from name of an Eskimo tribe in northwestern Alaska that developed the breed. The native form is malimiut. Bright offers no etymology.

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bronchial (adj.)
"pertaining to the bronchia," 1735, from Late Latin bronchus, from Greek bronkhos "windpipe, throat" (a word of unknown etymology) + -al (1). bronchial tubes is from 1847. Related: Bronchially.
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bifurcate (adj.)
"two-forked," 1835, from Medieval Latin bifurcatus, from Latin bi- "two" (see bi-) + furca "two-pronged fork," a word of unknown etymology. Nativized biforked in the same sense is from 1570s.
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pleomorphic (adj.)

"having more than one form," 1886, from pleo- "more" + -morphy "form, shape," from Greek morphē "form," a word of uncertain etymology. Pleomorphous is by 1854. Related: Pleomorphism.

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Kiowa 

native people of the U.S. southern Plains, 1810, earlier in Spanish records as Caigua, from a word in the people's language (Kiowa-Tanoan). Bright offers no etymology for it.

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Kiwanis 
businessmen's and professionals' society, formed in Detroit, Michigan, U.S., in 1915, the meaning and etymology of the name is obscure; early accounts of the clubs claim it is an Indian word meaning "barter, trade."
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dimorphous (adj.)

"existing in two forms" (especially of crystals), 1801, from Greek dimorphos "of two forms," from di- (see di- (1)) + morphē "form, shape," a word of uncertain etymology.

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