Etymology
Advertisement
paymaster (n.)

1540s, "military officer whose duty is to distribute their wages to the men and officers," from pay (n.) + master (n.). In the navy he also had charge of provisions, clothing, and small stores.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
overcoat (n.)

"large coat worn over ordinary clothing," 1802, from over- + coat (n.). Earlier words include overcloth "an outer garment" (late 14c.); overgarment "outer coat" (late 15c.).

Related entries & more 
sealskin (n.)

"the skin of a fur seal," dressed for use as material for clothing, etc., early 14c., from seal (n.2) + skin (n.). As an adjective by 1769.

Related entries & more 
livery (n.)
c. 1300, "household allowance of any kind (food, provisions, clothing) to retainers or servants," from Anglo-French livere (late 13c.; Old French liveree, Modern French livrée), "allowance, ration, pay," originally "(clothes) delivered by a master to his retinue," from fem. past participle of livrer "to dispense, deliver, hand over," from Latin liberare "to set free" (see liberate).

The sense later was reduced to "servants' rations" and "provender for horses" (mid-15c.). The former led to the meaning "distinctive clothing given to servants" (early 14c.); the latter now is obsolete, unless livery stable (1705) survives. Related: Liveried.
Related entries & more 
vestment (n.)
c. 1300, from Old French vestment (12c., Modern French vêtement), from Latin vestimentum "clothing, clothes," from vestire "to clothe," from PIE *wes- (4) "to clothe" (see wear (v.)). Related: Vestments; vestmental.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Alcoran (n.)
older form of Koran, mid-14c., from Old French alcoran, from Arabic al-quran "the Koran," literally "the Book," with the definite article (al-) taken as part of the name.
Related entries & more 
conveniences (n.)

"material appliances or arrangements conducive to personal comfort," 1670s, plural of convenience in the sense "that which gives ease or comfort; a convenient article or appliance."

Related entries & more 
accouter (v.)
also accoutre, "to dress or equip" (especially in military clothing and gear), 1590s, from French acoutrer, earlier acostrer (13c.) "arrange, dispose, put on (clothing)," probably originally "sew up," from Vulgar Latin *accosturare "to sew together, sew up," from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + *consutura "a sewing together," from Latin consutus, past participle of consuere "to sew together," from con- (see com-) + suere "to sew," from PIE root *syu- "to bind, sew." The English spelling reflects the 16c. French pronunciation. Related: Accoutered; accoutred; accoutering; accoutring.
Related entries & more 
gusset (n.)
early 14c., from Old French gosset "armhole; piece of armor for the armpit" (13c.), apparently from gousse "shell of a nut," a word of unknown origin. Originally an armorer's term; of clothing from 1560s.
Related entries & more 
clipping (n.2)

early 14c., "a cutting, act of shearing off," verbal noun from clip (v.1). Sense of "a small piece cut off" is from late 15c. Meaning "an article cut from a newspaper" is from 1857.

Related entries & more 

Page 5