Etymology
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ox-tongue (n.)

also oxtongue, "plant of the borage family with rough, tongue-shaped leaves," early 14c., oxe-tunge, from ox + tongue (n.).

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capo (n.1)

"leader of a Mafia 'family,' " 1952, Italian, literally "head," from Latin caput "head" (from PIE root *kaput- "head").

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gypsophila (n.)

genus of the pink family, 1771, from Modern Latin (Linnaeus), from Greek gypsos "chalk, gypsum" (see gypsum) + philein "to love" (see philo-).

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progeny (n.)

early 14c., progenie, "children, offspring" (of humans or animals); late 14c., "descent, lineage, family, ancestry," from Old French progenie (13c.) and directly from Latin progenies "descendants, offspring, lineage, race, family," from stem of progignere "beget," from pro "forth" (see pro-) + gignere "to produce, beget" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget").

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Medici 

Italian family that ruled Florence during the 15c., originally the plural of medico "a physician," from Latin medicus (see medical (adj.)). Related: Medicean.

[A]n illustrious family of Florence, appearing first as merchants of the medieval republic, and at the dawn of the Renaissance, in the fifteenth century, raised to supreme power through their liberality and merit. From this time on for three centuries, amid fortunes of varying brilliancy, this family produced popes, sovereigns, and tyrants, and it occupies a large place in the history of Europe. In the fine arts and literature the epithet has particular reference to Cosimo dei Medici, known as Cosimo the Elder, and to Lorenzo the Magnificent. [Century Dictionary]
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emir (n.)

among Arabic or Muslim peoples, "chief of a family or tribe; a ruling prince," 1590s, from Arabic amir "commander" (see admiral).

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Muskogean 

Native American language family of the southeastern U.S., 1890, from Muskogee, name of the Creek and related tribes (1775), from Creek maskoki.

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double-bass (n.)

string instrument, the largest and deepest instrument of the viol family, by 1728; see double (adj.) + bass (n.2).

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Celsius 

1797 in reference to the type of thermometer; 1812 in reference to the scale of temperatures, from the name of Swedish astronomer Anders Celsius (1701-1744) inventor of the centigrade scale in 1742. His family name is a Latinized translation of Högen, the name of the family estate in Sweden, taken as "mound," from Latin celsus "raised, high, lofty, great" (from PIE root *kel- (2) "to be prominent; hill"). 

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Bernoulli's principle 

named for Dutch mathematician Daniel Bernoulli (1700-1782), who published it in 1738. The family produced several noted mathematicians.

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