Etymology
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dentistry (n.)

"the art or profession of a dentist," 1803; see dentist + -ry.

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statecraft (n.)

"the art of government," 1640s, from state (n.2) + craft (n.).

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astronautics (n.)

"the art of traveling in outer space," 1929; see astronaut + -ics.

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hermeneutics (n.)

"art of interpretation, the study of exegesis," 1737, from hermeneutic; also see -ics.

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embroidery (n.)

late 14c., embrouderie "art of embroidering;" see embroider + -y (4). Meaning "embroidered work" is from 1560s.

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symmetrophobia (n.)

1809, from combining form of symmetry + -phobia. Supposed to be evident in Egyptian temples and Japanese art.

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propaedeutic (n.)

"an introduction to an art or science," 1798, from Greek propaideuein "to teach beforehand," from pro "before" (see pro-) + paideuein "to teach," from pais (genitive paidos) "child" (see pedo-). By 1849 as an adjective, "pertaining to the introduction to any art or science."

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technical (adj.)

1610s, "skilled in a particular art or subject," formed in English from technic + -al (1), or in part from Latinized form of Greek tekhnikos "of art; systematic," in reference to persons "skillful, artistic," from tekhnē "art, skill, craft" (see techno-).

The sense narrowed to "having to do with the mechanical arts" (1727). The basketball technical foul (one which does not involve contact between opponents) is recorded from 1934. The boxing technical knock-out (one in which the loser is not knocked out) is recorded from 1921; abbreviation TKO is from 1940s. Technical difficulty is from 1805.

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sculpture (n.)

late 14c., "the art or process of sculpture, the act or art of carving or shaping figures and other objects in the round or in relief on more or less hard surfaces," from Latin sculptura "sculpture," from past participle stem of sculpere "to carve, engrave," a back-formation from compounds such as exculpere, from scalpere "to carve, cut" (from PIE root *skel- (1) "to cut"). The meaning "a work of carved art" is from 1610s.

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cosmetic (n.)

c. 1600, "the art of beautifying, art of anointing or decorating the human body," from Latinized form of Greek kosmetike (tekhnē) "the art of dress and ornament," from fem. of kosmetikos "skilled in adornment or arrangement," from kosmein "to arrange, adorn," from kosmos "order; ornament" (see cosmos). The adjective is feminine because tekhne is a feminine noun.

Meaning "a preparation for beautifying, preparation that renders the n soft and pure or improves the complexion" (originally also the hair) is attested from 1640s. Related: Cosmetics.

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