Etymology
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symmetrophobia (n.)
1809, from combining form of symmetry + -phobia. Supposed to be evident in Egyptian temples and Japanese art.
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embroidery (n.)
late 14c., embrouderie "art of embroidering;" see embroider + -y (4). Meaning "embroidered work" is from 1560s.
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cabinetry (n.)

1825, "the art or craft of making cabinets;" 1857, "cabinets collectively;" from cabinet + -ry.

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wordcraft (n.)
Old English wordcræft "poetic art, eloquence;" see word (n.) + craft (n.).
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juried (adj.)
"judged by a jury," in reference to art shows, etc., 1963, from jury (n.).
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artificial (adj.)

late 14c., "not natural or spontaneous," from Old French artificial, from Latin artificialis "of or belonging to art," from artificium "a work of art; skill; theory, system," from artifex (genitive artificis) "craftsman, artist, master of an art" (music, acting, sculpting, etc.), from stem of ars "art" (see art (n.)) + -fex "maker," from facere "to do, make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put").

Earliest use in English is in the phrase artificial day "part of the day from sunrise to sunset" (as opposed to the natural day of 24 hours). Meaning "made by man, contrived by human skill and labor" is from early 15c. The word was applied from 16c. to anything made in imitation of, or as a substitute for, what is natural, whether real (light, tears) or not (teeth, flowers). Meaning "fictitious, assumed, not genuine" is from 1640s; that of "full of affectation, insincere" is from 1590s. Artificial insemination dates from 1894. Artificial intelligence "the science and engineering of making intelligent machines" was coined in 1956.

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virtu (n.)
"excellence in an object of art, passion for works of art," 1722, from Italian virtu "excellence," from Latin virtutem (nominative virtus) "virtue, goodness, manliness" (see virtue). The same word as virtue, borrowed during a period when everything Italian was in vogue. Sometimes spelled vertu, as though from French, but this sense of the word is not in French.
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cookery (n.)

"art or practice of cooking and dressing food for the table," late 14c.; see cook (n.) + -ery.

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ballooning (n.)
"art or process of ascending in and managing a balloon," 1784, verbal noun from balloon (v.).
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microscopy (n.)

"act or art of using a microscope; investigation with a microscope," 1660s, from microscope + -y (4).

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