Etymology
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pistolier (n.)

also pistoleer, "one who uses a pistol, soldier armed with a pistol," 1570s from obsolete French pistolier, from pistole (see pistol).

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carabinieri (n.)

"Italian police" (plural), 1847, from Italian carabinieri, plural of carabiniere, from French carabinier "soldier armed with a carbine," from carabine (see carbine).

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teeth (n.)

plural of tooth (n.). In reference to laws, contracts, etc., "power of enforcement," from 1925. To be armed to the teeth is from late 14c.

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lanceolate (adj.)

"shaped like a lance-head," 1751, from Late Latin lanceolatus "armed with a little lance," from Latin lanceola, diminutive of lancea (see lance (n.)).

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fusilier (n.)

also fusileer, 1670s, "soldier armed with a musket," from French fusilier "musket" (17c.), literally "piece of steel against which a flint strikes flame," from Old French fuisil, foisil "steel for striking fire; flint; whetstone; grindstone" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *focilis (petra) "(stone) producing fire," from Latin focus "hearth," in Vulgar Latin "fire" (see focus (n.)). Retained by certain regiments of the British army that were formerly armed with fusils.

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bitching (adj.)

also bitchen, "good," teen/surfer slang attested from 1950s, apparently from bitch (v.) in some inverted sense. The noun meaning "complaining" is attested by 1945, U.S. armed services.

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mutiny (v.)

"to revolt against lawful authority, with or without armed resistance, especially in the army or navy," 1580s, from mutiny (n.). Alternative mutine is recorded from 1550s. Related: Mutinied; mutinying.

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tablespoon (n.)

spoon used in table-service, 1763, from table (n.) + spoon (n.).

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ministry (n.)

c. 1200, ministerie, "the office or function of a priest, a position in a church or monastery; service in matters of religion," from Old French menistere "service, ministry; position, post, employment" and directly from Latin ministerium "office, service, attendance, ministry," from minister "inferior, servant, priest's assistant" (see minister (n.)).

From late 14c. as "personal service or aid." From 1560s as "the body of ministers of religion, the clerical class." From 1710 as "the body of ministers of state in a country." It began to be used 1916 in the names of certain departments in the British government.

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carabineer (n.)

also carbineer, "mounted soldier armed with a carbine," 1670s, from French carabinier (17c.), from carabine "carbine" (see carbine). Italian carabinieri "soldiers serving as a police force" is the same word.

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