Etymology
Advertisement
lanceolate (adj.)
"shaped like a lance-head," 1751, from Late Latin lanceolatus "armed with a little lance," from Latin lanceola, diminutive of lancea (see lance (n.)).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
strong-arm (adj.)
"using physical force," 1897, from noun phrase (c. 1600), from strong (adj.) + arm (n.). As a verb from 1903. Related: Strong-armed; strong-arming.
Related entries & more 
teeth (n.)
plural of tooth (n.). In reference to laws, contracts, etc., "power of enforcement," from 1925. To be armed to the teeth is from late 14c.
Related entries & more 
bitching (adj.)
also bitchen, "good," teen/surfer slang attested from 1950s, apparently from bitch (v.) in some inverted sense. Meaning "complaining" is by 1945, U.S. armed services.
Related entries & more 
aerodynamic (adj.)
also aero-dynamic, "pertaining to the forces of air in motion," 1847; see aero- + dynamic (adj.). Compare German aerodynamische (1835), French aérodynamique.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
demobilization (n.)

"action of disbanding troops; reduction of military forces to a peace status," 1866 (in reference to the Austro-Prussian War); see de- (privative) + mobilization. Earlier in German.

Related entries & more 
snow (v.)

c. 1300, from the noun, replacing Old English sniwan, which would have yielded modern snew (which existed as a parallel form until 17c. and, in Yorkshire, even later), from the root of snow (n.). The Old English verb is cognate with Middle Dutch sneuuwen, Dutch sneeuwen, Old Norse snjova, Swedish snöga.

Also þikke as snow þat snew,
Or al so hail þat stormes blew.
[Robert Mannyng of Brunne, transl. Wace's "Chronicle," c. 1330]

The figurative sense of "overwhelm; surround, cover, and imprison" (as deep snows can do to livestock) is 1880, American English, in phrase to snow (someone) under. Snow job "strong, persistent persuasion in a dubious cause" is World War II armed forces slang, probably from the same metaphoric image.

Related entries & more 
fusilier (n.)
also fusileer, 1670s, "soldier armed with a musket," from French fusilier "musket" (17c.), literally "piece of steel against which a flint strikes flame," from Old French fuisil, foisil "steel for striking fire; flint; whetstone; grindstone" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *focilis (petra) "(stone) producing fire," from Latin focus "hearth," in Vulgar Latin "fire" (see focus (n.)). Retained by certain regiments of the British army that were formerly armed with fusils.
Related entries & more 
mutiny (v.)

"to revolt against lawful authority, with or without armed resistance, especially in the army or navy," 1580s, from mutiny (n.). Alternative mutine is recorded from 1550s. Related: Mutinied; mutinying.

Related entries & more 
tourney (n.)
c. 1300, from Anglo-French turnei, Old French tornei "contest of armed men" (12c., Modern French tournoi), from tornoier "to joust, tilt" (see tourney (v.)).
Related entries & more 

Page 5