Etymology
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pika (n.)

small, rabbit-like animal of the alpine regions of Siberia and western North America, 1827, from Tunguse piika.

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vivisection (n.)

"dissection of a living animal," 1690s, from Latin vivus "alive" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live") + ending from dissection. Related: Vivisectionist.

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treacle (n.)

mid-14c., "medicinal compound, antidote for poison," from Old French triacle "antidote, cure for snake-bite" (c. 1200), from Vulgar Latin *triacula, from Latin theriaca, from Greek thēriakē (antidotos) "antidote for poisonous wild animals," from fem. of thēriakos "of a wild animal," from thērion "wild animal," diminutive of thēr (genitive thēros) "wild animal," from PIE root *ghwer- "wild beast."

The sense of "molasses" is recorded from 1690s (the connection may be from the use of molasses as a laxative, or its use to disguise the bad taste of medicine); that of "anything too sweet or sentimental" is from 1771. Related: Treacly.

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spermatogenesis (n.)

1877, earlier in German, from Greek sperma "seed" of an animal or plant (see sperm) + -genesis "birth, origin, creation."

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stinger (n.)

1550s, agent noun from sting (v.). As an animal part, from 1889; earlier in this sense was sting (n.).

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sweetbread (n.)

"pancreas of an animal used as food" 1560s, from sweet (adj.); the -bread element may be from Old English bræd "flesh."

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territorial (adj.)

1620s, "of or pertaining to a territory," from Late Latin territorialis, from territorium (see territory). In reference to British regiments, from 1881. In reference to an area defended by an animal, from 1920. Territorial waters is from 1841. Territorial army "British home defense" is from 1908. Territorial imperative "animal need to claim and defend territory" is from 1966.

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carnivore (n.)

"flesh-eating animal," 1839, from French carnivore (16c.), from Latin carnivorus "flesh-eating" (see carnivorous).

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fatling (n.)

"lamb, kid, or other young animal fattened for slaughter," 1520s, from fat (n.) + -ling.

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cave-dweller (n.)

"prehistoric human or animal who lived in natural caves," 1857, from cave (n.) + dweller.

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