Etymology
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political (adj.)

1550s, "of or pertaining to a polity, civil affairs, or government;" from Latin politicus "of citizens or the state" (see politic (adj.)) + -al (1). Meaning "taking sides in party politics" (usually pejorative) is from 1749. Political prisoner first recorded 1860; political science is from 1779 (first attested in Hume). Political animal translates Greek politikon zōon (Aristotle, "Politics," I.ii.9) "an animal intended to live in a city; a social animal":

From these things therefore it is clear that the city-state is a natural growth, and that man is by nature a political animal, and a man that is by nature and not merely by fortune citiless is either low in the scale of humanity or above it ... inasmuch as he is solitary, like an isolated piece at draughts. [Rackham transl.]
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chordate (adj.)

1885, "pertaining to or characteristic of the Chordata," from Chordata. Also from 1885 as a noun, "a chordate animal."

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vicuna (n.)

Peruvian ruminant, c. 1600, from Spanish vicuña, from Quechua (Inca) wikuna, the native name of the animal.

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territorial (adj.)
1620s, "of or pertaining to a territory," from Late Latin territorialis, from territorium (see territory). In reference to British regiments, from 1881. In reference to an area defended by an animal, from 1920. Territorial waters is from 1841. Territorial army "British home defense" is from 1908. Territorial imperative "animal need to claim and defend territory" is from 1966.
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spermatogenesis (n.)
1877, earlier in German, from Greek sperma "seed" of an animal or plant (see sperm) + -genesis "birth, origin, creation."
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stinger (n.)
1550s, agent noun from sting (v.). As an animal part, from 1889; earlier in this sense was sting (n.).
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sweetbread (n.)
"pancreas of an animal used as food" 1560s, from sweet (adj.); the -bread element may be from Old English bræd "flesh."
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carnivore (n.)
"flesh-eating animal," 1839, from French carnivore (16c.), from Latin carnivorus "flesh-eating" (see carnivorous).
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fatling (n.)
"lamb, kid, or other young animal fattened for slaughter," 1520s, from fat (n.) + -ling.
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cave-dweller (n.)

"prehistoric human or animal who lived in natural caves," 1857, from cave (n.) + dweller.

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