Etymology
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impoverishment (n.)
1550s, from Anglo-French empoverissement, from empoverir; see impoverish + -ment.
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oyer (n.)

early 15c., "a criminal hearing of causes," from Anglo-French oyer, Old French oir, oier, from Latin audire "to hear" (from PIE root *au- "to perceive"). Especially in phrase oyer and terminer (early 15c., but from late 13c. in Anglo-Latin and Anglo-French), literally "a hearing and determining," in England a court of judges of assize, in some U.S. states a higher criminal court.

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Woden 
Anglo-Saxon god, Old English, see Odin.
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benedict (n.)
"newly married man" (especially one who had seemed a confirmed bachelor), 1821, from the character Benedick in "Much Ado About Nothing" (1599). The name is from Late Latin Benedictus, literally "blessed," from Latin benedicte "bless (you)" (see benediction). This also produced the proper name and surname Bennet; hence also benet (late 14c.), the third of the four lesser orders of the Roman Catholic Church, one of whose functions was to exorcize spirits.
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opus (n.)

"a work, composition," especially a musical one, 1809, from Latin opus "a work, labor, exertion" (source of Italian opera, French oeuvre, Spanish obra), from Proto-Italic *opes- "work," from PIE root *op- "to work, produce in abundance." The plural, seldom used as such, is opera. Opus Dei, literally "the work of God," is a Catholic organization founded in Spain in 1928 to re-establish Christian ideals in society through examples of the lives of the members.

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penitent (adj.)

"sorry for offenses committed, repentant of one's sins, contrite," mid-14c., from Old French pénitent (14c.) and directly from Latin paenitentem (Medieval Latin penitentem) "penitent" (see penitence).

As a noun, "one undergoing penance, a repentant sinner," late 14c., from the adjective (earlier in this sense was penaunt, early 14c., from Old French peneant). Also, in plural, a name distinguishing some Catholic orders, especially those formed for the reception of reformed courtesans.

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intermeddle (v.)
late 14c., entremedlen, "to mix together, blend," from Anglo-French entremedler, Old French entremesler; from inter- + Anglo-French medler (see meddle (v.)). From early 15c. as "involve oneself in what is not one's business."
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begorra (interj.)
1839, antiquated Anglo-Irish form of expletive By God.
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imprimatur (n.)

"licence to print, granted by a licenser of the press," 1640, Modern Latin, literally "let it be printed," the formula of a book licenser, third person singular present subjunctive passive of Latin imprimere "to print, engrave, stamp; press upon, press against," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + premere "to press, hold fast, cover, crowd, compress" (from PIE root *per- (4) "to strike"). Originally of state licence to print books, later only of Roman Catholic Church.

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