Etymology
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obtuse (adj.)

early 15c., "dull, blunted, not sharp," from Latin obtusus "blunted, dull," also used figuratively, past participle of obtundere "to beat against, make dull," from ob "in front of; against" (see ob-) + tundere "to beat," from PIE *(s)tud-e- "to beat, strike, push, thrust," from root *(s)teu- "to push, stick, knock, beat" (source also of Latin tudes "hammer," Sanskrit tudati "he thrusts"). Sense of "stupid, not acutely sensitive or perceptive" is by c. 1500. In geometry, in reference to a plane angle greater than a right angle," 1560s. Related: Obtusely; obtuseness.

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bedpost (n.)
also bed-post, "post forming an angle of a bed frame," 1590s, from bed (n.) + post (n.1). Formerly they were made high to support a canopy and rods for a curtain.
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tutu (n.)
ballet skirt, 1910, from French tutu, alteration of cucu, infantile reduplication of cul "bottom, backside," from Latin culus "bottom, backside, fundament," from PIE *kuh-lo- "backside, rear" (source also of Old Irish cul "back," Welsh cil "corner, angle"), ultimate origin obscure [de Vaan].
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cantonment (n.)
1756, "military quarters, part of a town assigned to a particular regiment," from French cantonnement, from cantonner "to divide into cantons" (14c.), from canton "angle, corner" (see canton). Meaning "action of quartering troops" is from 1757.
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Narragansett 

1622, originally in reference to the native people, later to the place in Rhode Island, from southern New England Algonquian Naiaganset "(people) of the small point of land," containing nai- "a point or angle."

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cross-section (n.)

"section of something made by a plane passing through it at a right angle to one of its axes," 1748, originally in engineering sketches, from cross (adj.) + section (n.). Figurative sense of "representative sample" is by 1903.

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quoin (n.)

1530s, in architecture and masonry, "cornerstone, external solid angle," a variant spelling of coin (n.); in early use also in other senses of that word, including "a wedge, wedge-like piece of stone, wood, etc."

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two-time (v.)
"to deceive, cheat, betray," 1924, perhaps from notion of "to have two at a time." An earlier reference (1922) in a Kentucky criminal case involves a double-cross or betrayal without a romance angle. Related: two-timing (adj.); two-timer.
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arete (n.1)
"sharp crest of a mountain," 1862, from Swiss French arête, Old French areste, from Latin arista "ear of grain, the top of an ear," in Medieval Latin also "backbone of a fish; exterior angle of a house," which perhaps is of Etruscan origin. The figure is of something jagged.
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geniculate (adj.)
"having knots or joints; bent like a knee," 1660s, from Latin geniculatus "having knots, knotted," from geniculum "little knee, knot on the stalk of a plant," diminutive of genu "knee" (from PIE root *genu- (1) "knee; angle"). Related: Geniculation (1610s).
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