Etymology
Advertisement
papoose (n.)

"North American Indian baby or young child," commonly carried by its mother bound up and strapped to a board, 1630s, from Narragansett papoos "child," or a similar New England Algonquian word; said to mean literally "very young."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Catawba (n.)

type of American grape, 1857, the name taken from the river in the Carolinas, in which region the grape was found. The river is named for the Katahba Indian group and language (Siouan), from their word katapu "fork of a stream," itself a Muskogean loan-word meaning "separate."

Related entries & more 
pictograph (n.)

"pictorial symbol, picture or symbol representing an idea," 1851, from picto-, combining form of Latin pictus "painted," past participle of pingere "to paint" (see paint (v.)) + -graph "something written." First used in reference to American Indian writing. Related: Pictography; pictographic.

Related entries & more 
bandicoot (n.)

1789, a corruption of Telugu pandi-kokku, literally "pig-rat." Properly the Anglo-Indian name of a large and destructive type of Indian rat; applied from 1827 to a type of insectivorous Australian marsupial somewhat resembling it.

Related entries & more 
bad-mouth (v.)

"abuse (someone) verbally," 1941, probably ultimately from noun phrase bad mouth (1835), in African-American vernacular, "a curse, spell," translating an idiom found in African and West Indian languages. See bad (adj.) + mouth (n.). Related: Bad-mouthed; bad-mouthing.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
masala 

spice blends, particularly in Indian cookery. In English by 1833 (as musala.) Masala film, an Indian movie with multiple genre elements, named for the spice blend, by 1990.

Related entries & more 
gamelan (n.)

"East Indian orchestra," 1817, from Javanese gamel "to handle."

Related entries & more 
nig (n.)

c. 1300, "stingy person," which is connected to niggard (q.v.). As an abbreviated form of nigger, the word is attested by c. 1832, in American English, in the "Jim Crow" song. It is noted in an 1879 British book on colonial household management as "a term too often applied ... to the Indian natives."

Related entries & more 
spliff (n.)

conical cannabis cigarette, 1936, a West Indian word, of unknown origin.

Related entries & more 
pone (n.)

1630s, "American Indian bread," earlier appone, ponap (1610s), from Powhatan (Algonquian) apan "something baked," from apen "she bakes." Later used in Southern U.S. for any type of cornbread, "especially coarse kinds used by the negroes and poorer whites, commonly called corn-pone" [Century Dictionary, 1897]. Properly, corn pone is made from corn flour and milk, baked or fried.

Related entries & more 

Page 5