Etymology
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ho (n.)

by 1993, American English slang, representing an African-American vernacular pronunciation of whore.

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A.A.A. 

also AAA, abbreviation of American Automobile Association, attested 1902, American English, the year the organization was founded.

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firewater (n.)

also fire-water, "alcoholic liquor," 1826, American English, supposedly from speech of American Indians, from fire (n.) + water (n.1).

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jerky (n.)

1850, American English, from American Spanish charqui "jerked meat," from Quechua (Inca) ch'arki "dried flesh."

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sansei (n.)

"American born of nisei parents; third-generation Japanese-American," 1945, from Japanese san "three, third" + sei "generation."

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kinkajou (n.)

Central American mammal, 1796, from French (1670s), from an Algonquian word for the wolverine; the North American word was erroneously transferred by Buffon to the tropical animal.

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Amerind (n.)

1899, coined by Maj. John Wesley Powell at the Bureau of American Ethnology, where he was director, from American + Indian.

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Americano (n.)

"cup of weak or diluted coffee," especially espresso, short for café Americano (by 1964), from Spanish, literally "American coffee" (see American), a Central American term from the 1950s, a disparaging reference to the type of coffee believed to be favored in the United States.

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condor (n.)

"large, South American bird of prey," c. 1600, from American Spanish, from Quechua (Inca) cuntur, the native name for the bird.

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catalpa (n.)

type of large-leaved North American tree with winged seeds, c. 1740, from an American Indian language of the Carolinas, perhaps Creek (Muskogean) /katalpa/, literally "head-wing."

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