Etymology
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cartage (n.)
c. 1300, "act of carrying in a cart," also "price paid for carting," from cart + -age.
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shrinkage (n.)
1713, "act or fact of shrinking," from shrink (v.) + -age. Meaning "amount by which something has shrunk" is from 1862.
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anecdotage (n.)
1823, "anecdotes collectively," from anecdote + -age. As a jocular coinage meaning "garrulous old age" it is recorded from 1835, and spawned anecdotard (1894).
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poundage (n.)

early 15c., "tax or subsidy per pound of weight;" 1903 as "weight;" from pound (n.1) + -age.

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thanage (n.)
c. 1400, from Anglo-French thaynage (c. 1300), from English thane + Old French suffix -age (see -age).
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stoppage (n.)
mid-15c., "deduction from payment," from stop (v.) + -age. From late 15c. as "impediment, hindrance, obstruction;" 1650s as "act of stopping."
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peonage (n.)

the work or condition of a peon; a form of servitude formerly prevailing in Mexico," "1848, American English, from peon (q.v.) + -age.

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sewage (n.)
1818, from sew (v.) "to drain, draw off water" (late 15c., from sewer (n.1)) + -age.
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percentage (n.)

"a proportion or rate per hundred," 1789, from percent + -age. Commercial sense of "profit, advantage" is from 1862.

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ageism (n.)
"discrimination against people based on age," coined 1969 by U.S. gerontologist Dr. Robert N. Butler, from age (n.) + -ism, on pattern of racism, sexism. Related: Ageist.
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