Etymology
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spousage (n.)

"marriage, wedlock," mid-14c., from spouse (n.) + -age.

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ageism (n.)

"discrimination against people based on age," coined 1969 by U.S. gerontologist Dr. Robert N. Butler (1927-1910), from age (n.) + -ism, on pattern of racism, sexism. Related: Ageist.

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haulage (n.)

1826, "action of hauling," from haul (v.) + -age.

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post-glacial (adj.)

"subsequent to the Ice Age," 1855, from post- + glacial.

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adolescence (n.)

"the age following childhood, the age of growing" (roughly the period from the 15th to the 21st year; or age 14 to 25 in males, 12 to 21 in females), early 15c., from Old French adolescence (13c.), from Latin adolescentia/adulescentia "youth, youthful people collectively," abstract noun from adulescentem "growing, youthful" (see adolescent (n.)). Adolescency (late 14c.) is slightly earlier.

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dotage (n.)

late 14c., "condition of being foolish; foolish love, infatuation," literally "the condition of one who dotes," from dote (v.) + -age. Also from late 14c. as "senility; feebleness or imbecility of mind in old age."

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reportage (n.)

"the describing of events," 1877, from French; see report (v.) + -age.

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seepage (n.)

"percolation, oozing fluid or moisture," 1825, from seep + -age.

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*gere- (1)

*gerə-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to grow old." It forms all or part of: geriatric; geriatrics; gerontocracy; gerontology.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit jara "old age," jarati "makes frail, causes to age;" Avestan zaurvan "old age;" Greek geron "old man;" Ossetic zarond "old man;" Armenian cer "old, old man."

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voltage (n.)

"electromotive force reckoned in volts," 1882, from volt + -age.

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