Etymology
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post-nuptial (adj.)

also postnuptial, "being or happening after marriage," 1715, from post- + nuptial.

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post-graduate (adj.)

also postgraduate, 1858, in reference to a course of study pursued after graduation, originally American English, from post- + graduate (adj.). As a noun, "one studying after graduation," attested from 1890. Abbreviation post-grad is recorded from 1950.

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sith (adv., conj., prep.)
"since" (obsolete), Middle English, reduced from Old English siððan "then, thereupon; continuously, during which; seeing that," from *sið þon "subsequent to that," from sið "after," from Proto-Germanic *sith- "later, after" (source also of Old Saxon sith "after that, since, later," German seit "since," Gothic seiþus "late"), from PIE *se- (2) "long, late" (see soiree).
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succeed (v.)

late 14c., succeden, intransitive and transitive, "come next after, follow after another; take the place of another, be elected or chosen for" a position, from Old French succeder "to follow on" (14c.) and directly from Latin succedere "come after, follow after; go near to; come under; take the place of," also "go from under, mount up, ascend," hence "get on well, prosper, be victorious," from sub "next to, after" (see sub-) + cedere "go, move" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield").

Meaning "to continue, endure" is from early 15c. The sense of "turn out well, have a favorable result" in English is first recorded late 15c., with ellipsis of adverb (succeed well). Of persons, "to be successful," from c. 1500. Related: Succeeded; succeeding.

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pattern (v.)

1580s, "to make a pattern for, design, plan" (a sense now obsolete), from pattern (n.). Meaning "to make something after a pattern" is from c. 1600; that of "to cover with a design or pattern" is by 1857. To pattern after "take as a model" is by 1878.

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successor (n.)
"one who comes after," late 13c., from Anglo-French successor and Old French successour "successor, heir" (12c., Modern French successeur), from Latin successor "follower, successor," agent noun from past participle stem of succedere "to come after" (see succeed).
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lyricism (n.)
1760, perhaps an isolated use; common after mid-19c., from lyric + -ism.
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effects (n.)
"goods, property," 1704, plural of effect (n.); after a use of French effets.
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epode (n.)
1590s, a kind of lyric poem in which a short line follows a longer one (invented by Archilochus, also used by Horace), from Latin epodos, from Greek epodus "after-song, incantation," from epi "after" (see epi-) + odein "to sing" (see ode). Related: Epodic.
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remarriage (n.)

also re-marriage, "any marriage after the first," 1610s, from re- "again" + marriage (n.).

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