Etymology
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accustom (v.)
"familiarize by custom or use," early 15c., from Old French acostumer "become accustomed; accustom, bring into use" (12c., Modern French accoutumer), from à "to" (see ad-) + verb from costume "habit, practice" (see custom (n.)). Related: Accustomed; accustoming.
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season (v.)
"improve the flavor of by adding spices," c. 1300, from Old French assaisoner "to ripen, season," from a- "to" (see ad-) + root of season (n.) on the notion of fruit becoming more palatable as it ripens. Applied to timber by 1540s. In 16c., it also meant "to copulate with."
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apparatus (n.)

"a collection of tools, utensils, etc. adapted as a means to some end," 1620s, from Latin apparatus "tools, implements, equipment; preparation, a preparing," noun of state from past participle stem of apparare "prepare," from ad "to" (see ad-) + parare "make ready" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure").

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adumbration (n.)

1550s, "faint sketch, imperfect representation," from Latin adumbrationem (nominative adumbratio) "a sketch in shadow, sketch, outline," noun of action from past-participle stem of adumbrare "to cast a shadow, overshadow," in painting, "represent (a thing) in outline," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + umbrare "to cast in shadow," from PIE root *andho- "blind; dark" (see umbrage).

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Gradus ad Parnassum (n.)

Latin, literally "A Step to Parnassus," the mountain sacred to Apollo and the Muses; from Latin gradus "a step; a step climbed; a step toward something" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go"). Also see Parnassus. It was the title of a dictionary of prosody used in English public schools for centuries as a guide to Roman poetry. The book dates from the 1680s. Also the name of a treatise on musical composition written in Latin by Johann Joseph Fux, published in Vienna in 1725, and of a much-used book of exercises for piano.

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Aberdeen 
city in eastern Scotland, literally "mouth of the (River) Don," which enters the North Sea there, from Gaelic aber "(river) mouth," from Celtic *ad-ber-o-, from *ad- "to" (see ad-) + *ber- "to carry," from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry." Compare Inverness. Related: Aberdonian.
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acclivity (n.)
Origin and meaning of acclivity
"upward slope of ground," 1610s, from Latin acclivitatem (nominative acclivitas) "an ascending direction, rising grade, upward steepness," from acclivis "mounting upwards, ascending," from ad "to, up to" (see ad-) + clivus "hill, a slope," from PIE *klei-wo-, suffixed form of root *klei- "to lean."
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appropriate (v.)
early 15c., "take possession of, take exclusively," from Late Latin appropriatus, past participle of appropriare, adpropriare "to make one's own," from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + propriare "take as one's own," from proprius "one's own" (see proper). Related: Appropriated; appropriating.
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allative (adj.)

in reference to the grammatical case expressing "motion towards," 1854, with -ive + Latin allat-, past participle stem of the irregular verb adferre/affere "to bring to;" from assimilated form of ad "to" (see ad-) + lātus "borne, carried" (see oblate (n.)).

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alluvium (n.)
"matter deposited by flowing water," 1660s, from noun use of Medieval Latin alluvium, neuter of alluvius "washed against," from Latin alluere "wash against," from ad "to, against" (see ad-) + -luere, combining form of lavere "to wash" (from PIE root *leue- "to wash").
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