Etymology
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credit (v.)

1540s, "to believe, be sure of the truth of," from credit (n.). In a looser sense, "to attribute, give as the cause of," 1850. Meaning "to enter upon the credit side of an account" is from 1680s. Related: Credited; crediting.

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re-enter (v.)

mid-15c., reentren, "to enter (a place) again or anew," from re-, denoting "repetition of an action," + enter. By 1838 in reference to an account or record. Related: Re-entered; re-entering.

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utilize (v.)

1794, from French utiliser, from Italian utilizzare, from utile "usable," from Latin utilis "usable," from uti "make use of, profit by, take advantage of" (see use (v.)).

Utilize is fast antiquating improve, in the sense of 'turn to account.' [Fitzedward Hall, "Modern English," 1873]
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narration (n.)

early 15c., narracioun, "act of telling a story or recounting in order the particulars of some action, occurrence, or affair," also "that which is narrated or recounted, a story, an account of events," from Old French narracion "account, statement, a relating, recounting, narrating, narrative tale," and directly from Latin narrationem (nominative narratio) "a relating, narrative," noun of action from past-participle stem of narrare "to tell, relate, recount, explain," literally "to make acquainted with," from gnarus "knowing," from PIE *gne-ro-, suffixed form of root *gno- "to know."

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reputable (adj.)

1610s, "capable of being taken into account" (a sense now obsolete), from repute (n.) + -able. Meaning "consistent with good reputation, not mean or disgraceful" is by 1670s; of persons, "held in esteem, having a good reputation" by 1690s. Related: Reputably.

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misrepresent (v.)

1640s, "give a false or incorrect account of, whether intentionally or not," from mis- (1) "badly, wrongly" + represent. Meaning "to fail to represent correctly as an agent of" is by 1860. Related: Misrepresented; misrepresenting.

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debit (n.)

mid-15c., "something that is owed, a debt," from Old French debet or directly from Latin debitum "thing owed, that which is owing," neuter past participle of debere "to owe," originally, "keep something away from someone," from de "away" (see de-) + habere "to have" (from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive").

In book-keeping, "an entry into an account of a sum of money owing," 1776. As a verb, "to charge with a debt," from 1680s; from 1865 as "enter on the debit side of an account." Related: Debited; debiting; debitor. Debit card is attested from 1975.

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plutocrat (n.)

"person who rules or sways a community or society by virtue of his wealth; person possessing power or influence solely or mainly on account of his riches," 1838, a back-formation from plutocracy. Related: Plutocratic (1843); plutocratical (1833).

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roc (n.)

monstrous predatory bird of Arabian mythology, 1570s, from Arabic rukhkh, from Persian rukh. It is mentioned in Marco Polo's account of Madagascar; according to OED, modern use of the word mostly is due to translations of the "Arabian Nights" tales. Hence roc's egg "something marvelous or prodigious." Compare simurgh.

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history (n.)
Origin and meaning of history

late 14c., "relation of incidents" (true or false), from Old French estoire, estorie "story; chronicle, history" (12c., Modern French histoire), from Latin historia "narrative of past events, account, tale, story," from Greek historia "a learning or knowing by inquiry; an account of one's inquiries; knowledge, account, historical account, record, narrative," from historein "be witness or expert; give testimony, recount; find out, search, inquire," and histōr "knowing, expert; witness," both ultimately from PIE *wid-tor-, from root *weid- "to see," hence "to know."

It is thus related to Greek idein "to see," and to eidenai "to know." Beekes writes of histōr that "The word itself, but especially the derivations ... that arose in Ionic, have spread over the Hellenic and Hellenistic world together with Ionic science and philosophy." 

In Middle English, not differentiated from story (n.1); sense of "narrative record of past events" probably first attested late 15c. Meaning "the recorded events of the past" is from late 15c. As a branch of knowledge, from late 15c. Meaning "a historical play or drama" is from 1590s. Sense of "systematic account (without reference to time) of a set of natural phenomena" (1560s) is now obsolete except in natural history (as late as the 1880s published county histories in the U.S. routinely included natural history chapters, with lists of birds and fishes and illustrations of local slugs and freshwater clams). Meaning "an eventful career, a past worthy of note" (a woman with a history) is from 1852. To make history "be notably engaged in public events" is from 1862.

History is the interpretation of the significance that the past has for us. [Johan Huizinga, "The Task of the Cultural Historian"]
History is more or less bunk [Henry Ford, Chicago Tribune, May 25, 1916]
One difference between history and imaginative literature ... is that history neither anticipates nor satisfies our curiosity, whereas literature does. [Guy Davenport, "Wheel Ruts," 1996]
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