Etymology
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Sahara 

great desert of northern Africa, 1610s, from Arabic çahra "desert" (plural çahara), according to Klein, noun use of fem. of the adjective asharu "yellowish red." Related: Saharan.

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Nome 

city in Alaska, founded in the 1898 gold rush and originally Anvil City after the nearby Anvil Creek, it was later renamed for nearby Cape Nome, which, according to one story is from a misreading of a British cartographer's query, ?Name, written beside the peninsula on an 1849 map, and according to another is from a supposed native no-me meaning "I don't know," a plea of noncomprehension when asked what the name of the place was.

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swage (v.)
"to shape or bend by use of a tool," 1831, from swage (n.), also swedge, "tool or die for bending cold metal" (1812), from French suage, according to Century Dictionary from suer "to sweat." Uncertain connection to swage "ornamental moulding" (late 14c.), from Old French souage (Modern French suage), which, according to Klein, is from soue "rope," from Vulgar Latin *soca, probably of Gaulish origin (compare Breton sug "cord").
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La-Z-Boy 
brand of recliner chair, 1929, Floral City Furniture Co., Monroe, Michigan, U.S. According to company lore, chosen from names submitted in a contest. See lazy + boy.
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bore (v.2)

"be tiresome or dull," 1768, a vogue word c. 1780-81 according to Grose (1785); see bore (n.2). As "cause boredom to," by 1840. 

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omen (n.)

"casual event or occurrence supposed to portend good or evil," 1580s, from Latin omen "foreboding, augury," according to Varro from Old Latin osmen; a word of unknown origin.

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sprat (n.)
small European herring, 1590s, variant of sprot (c. 1300), from Old English sprott "a small herring," according to Klein related to Dutch sprot and probably connected to sprout (v.).
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coati (n.)

long-tailed Brazilian raccoon, 1670s, from Spanish quachi, quasje, from a name in the Tupi native language of Brazil; according to OED it is a compound of cua "belt, cincture" + tim "nose."

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sun-up (n.)
also sunup, "sunrise," 1712, from sun (n.) + up (adv.). In local use in U.S., and, according to OED, also in Caribbean English and formerly in South Africa.
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shelta (n.)
secret language of Irish tinkers, 1876, of unknown origin. According to OED it mostly consists of Irish or Gaelic words with inversion or arbitrary substitution of initial consonants.
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