Etymology
Advertisement
superimpose (v.)
1787, back-formation from superimposition (1680s), or from super- + impose. Compare Latin superimponere "to put upon, place over, place above." Related: Superimposed; superimposing.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
*uper 
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "over."

It forms all or part of: hyper-; insuperable; over; over-; sirloin; somersault; soprano; soubrette; sovereign; sum; summit; super-; superable; superb; superior; supernal; supra-; supreme; sur-.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit upari, Avestan upairi "over, above, beyond;" Greek hyper, Latin super "above, over;" Old English ofer "over," German über, Gothic ufaro "over, across;" Gaulish ver-, Old Irish for.
Related entries & more 
hyperspace (n.)
1866, in geometry, "imaginary space of more than three dimensions," from hyper- "over, above, beyond" + space (n.). A hybrid; correctly formed it would be superspace.
Related entries & more 
superhuman (adj.)
1630s, from Medieval Latin superhumanus; see super- + human (adj.). In early use often "divine," since 19c. typically "above the powers or nature of man." Related: Superhumanly.
Related entries & more 
nasopharynx (n.)

"part of the pharynx which is behind and above the soft palate, continuous with the nasal passages," 1873, from naso-, combining form of Latin nasus "nose" (from PIE root *nas- "nose") + pharynx. Related: Nasopharyngeal (1860); nasopharyngitis (1879).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
chiefly (adv.)

"pre-eminently, above all, in the first place," mid-14c., from chief (adj.) + -ly (2). Adjectival meaning "pertaining to a chief" is from 1870 (from chief + -ly (1)).

Related entries & more 
supernatural (adj.)

early 15c. "of or given by God," from Medieval Latin supernaturalis "above or beyond nature, divine," from Latin super "above" (see super-) + natura "nature" (see nature (n.)). Originally with more of a religious sense, "of or given by God, divine; heavenly;" association with ghosts, etc., has predominated since 19c. Related: Supernaturalism.

That is supernatural, whatever it be, that is either not in the chain of natural cause and effect, or which acts on the chain of cause and effect, in nature, from without the chain. [Horace Bushnell, "Nature and the Supernatural," 1858]
Related entries & more 
idem (adv.)
"the same (as above)," used to avoid repetition in writing, Latin, literally "the same," from id "it, that one," from PIE pronominal stem *i- (see yon) + demonstrative suffix -dem.
Related entries & more 
Shanghai 
Chinese seaport, literally "by the sea," from Shang "on, above" + hai "sea." In 19c., a long-legged breed of hens, supposed to have come from there; hence U.S. slang senses relating to long, tall persons or things.
Related entries & more 
Yarborough (n.)
in bridge/whist, a hand with no card above a nine, 1874, said to be so called for an unnamed Earl of Yarborough who bet 1,000 to 1 against its occurrence.
Related entries & more 

Page 5