Etymology
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whereby (adv.)

"by what, by which," c. 1200, from where (in the sense of "in which position or circumstances") + by.

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par excellence 

French, from Latin per excellentiam "by the way of excellence." French par "by, through, by way of, by means of" is from Latin per (see per). For second element, see excellence.

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med (n.)

by 1851 as a shortening of medic. As a colloquial shortening of medicine, by 1942. With a capital M and short for Mediterranean, by 1948. Meds as a shortening of medications is attested in hospital jargon by 1965.

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muted (adj.)

by 1840, in reference to musical instruments, past-participle adjective from mute (v.). Figuratively by 1879. Of colors by 1905. Related: mutedness.

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drainage (n.)

1650s, "act or process of draining," from drain (v.) + -age. Sense of "the water carried off by a system of rivers" is by 1860. Meaning "system by means of which something is drained" is by 1878.

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down (v.)

1560s, "cause to go down," from down (adv.). Meaning "swallow hastily" is by 1860; football sense of "bring down (an opposing player) by tackling" is attested by 1887. Figurative sense of "defeat, get the better of" is by 1898. Related: Downed; downing.

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macular (adj.)

by 1806, "spotted, exhibiting or characterized by spots," from macula "a spot" + -ar. Meaning "pertaining to the macula lutea of the eye is by 1873.

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wherewithal (adv.)

"means by which," 1530s, from where + withal. The noun is attested by 1809.

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yourself 

by early 14c., from your + self. Plural yourselves is attested by 1520s.

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btw 
internet abbreviation of by the way, in use by 1989.
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