Etymology
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abdominals (n.)

short for abdominal muscles, attested by 1980; see abdominal.

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abduce (v.)
Origin and meaning of abduce

"to draw away" by persuasion or argument, 1530s, from Latin abductus, past participle of abducere "to lead away, take away," also in figurative senses, from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead"). Related: Abduced; abducing.

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abducent (adj.)
Origin and meaning of abducent

"drawing away, pulling aside," 1713, from Latin abducentem (nominative abducens), present participle of abducere "to lead away," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead").

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abduct (v.)

"to kidnap," 1834, probably a back-formation from abduction; also compare abduce, the earlier verb, which has a more abstract sense. Related: Abducted; abducting.

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abduction (n.)
Origin and meaning of abduction

1620s, "a leading away," from Latin abductionem (nominative abductio) "a forcible carrying off, ravishing, robbing," noun of action from past-participle stem of abducere "to lead away, take away, arrest" (often by force), from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead"). As "criminal act of forcibly taking (someone)" by 1768; before that the word also was a term in surgery and logic. In the Mercian hymns, Latin abductione is glossed by Old English wiðlaednisse.

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abductor (n.)

1610s, in physiology, a muscle that moves (a limb) away from the axis of the body, from Latin abductor, agent noun from abducere "to lead away," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead").

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abeam (adv.)

"at right angles to the keel" of a ship, hence in line with its beam, 1826, nautical, literally "on beam;" see a- (1) + beam (n.) in the nautical sense.

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abecedary (n.)

"primer, alphabet table," mid-15c., from Medieval Latin abecedarium "an ABC book," neuter of adjective abecedarius, used as a noun, from the first four letters of the Latin alphabet. Abecedarian (adj.) is attested from 1660s.

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abed (adv.)

"in bed," c. 1200, contraction of Old English on bedde "in bed," from a- (1) + dative of bed (n.).

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Aberdeen 

city in eastern Scotland, literally "mouth of the (River) Don," which enters the North Sea there, from Gaelic aber "(river) mouth," from Celtic *ad-ber-o-, from *ad- "to" (see ad-) + *ber- "to carry" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry"). Compare Inverness. Related: Aberdonian.

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