Etymology
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bryology (n.)
1823, "biological science of mosses and their relatives," from bryo- "moss" + -logy. Related: Bryologist (1826); bryological.
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oncology (n.)

"the scientific study of tumors," 1857, coined in English from onco- "tumor" + -logy "science or study of." Related: Oncologist; oncological.

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tribology (n.)
1965, "study of friction," from Greek tribos "rubbing," from tribein "to rub, rub down, wear away" (from PIE root *tere- (1) "to rub, turn") + -logy.
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choreology (n.)

"the study of dancing," 1955, from Latinized form of Greek khoreia "dance" (see chorus) + connective -o- + -logy.

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teratology (n.)
"study of marvels and monstrosities," 1842, from terato- + -logy. Earlier it meant "marvelous narrative" (1670s), from Greek teratologia "a telling of marvels." Related: Teratological; teratologist.
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ontology (n.)

"the metaphysical science or study of being and the essence of things," 1660s (Gideon Harvey), from Modern Latin ontologia (c. 1600); see onto- + -logy. Related: Ontologist.

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zoology (n.)
"science of animals," 1660s, from Modern Latin zoologia, from Greek zoion "animal" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live") + -logia "study" (see -logy).
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gastrology (n.)
"cooking, good eating," 1810, from gastro- "stomach" + -logy. Compare gastronomy. Gastrologia was the title of a lost work by Archestratus.
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rheology (n.)

"study of the deformation of the flow of matter," 1929, from French rhéologie; see rheo- "current of a stream" + -logy "study of." Related: Rheologist; rheological.

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phycology (n.)

"study of seaweeds, the department of botany that treats of algae or seaweed," 1847, from phyco- + -logy. Related: Phycological; phycologist.

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